Cub Scout and Boy Scout Awards


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50 Miler

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The primary objective of this program is to stimulate Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, and Venturer interest in the ideals of the movement and to promote activity that will result in personal fitness, self-reliance, knowledge of wood lore, and a practical understanding of conservation.

Chartered unit participation is most desirable; however, provisional groups are eligible. This award does not apply if any other is available for a trip.

The new patch is shown to the right above the older patch.


The Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer unit or provisional group must follow these rules for a 50-Miler trip:
  • Select a suitable trail or waterway.
  • Adult leaders older than 21 must make the entire trip.
  • If the trip is five hundred miles or more from homes of group members (local council camp excepted) or crosses national boundaries and into the territory of other nations, a National Permit Application, No 34419, is necessary. For trips and overnight camps less than five hundred miles, use a Local Tour Permit Application, No. 34426.


The 50 Miler Award is available as a Cloth or Leather Patch or a Decal.

It is NOT worn on the Uniform, but may be attached to equipment, jackets, backpacks, patch vests or blankets, etc.

The 50-Miler Award is presented to each qualifying individual for satisfactory participation in an approved trip. In order to qualify for the award the group of which the individual is a member must fulfill all of the following requirements.
  1. Make complete and satisfactory plans for the trip, including the possibilities of advancement.
  2. Cover the trail or canoe or boat route of not less than 50 consecutive miles (a maximum of 10 miles per day); take a minimum of 5 consecutive days to complete the trip without the aid of motors. (In some areas pack animals may be used.)
  3. During the time on the trail or waterway, complete a minimum of 10 hours each of group work on projects to improve the trail, springs, campsite, portage or area. If after checking with recognized authorities, it is not possible to complete 10 hours each of group work on the trail, a similar project may be done in the unit's home area ( There should be no unauthorized cutting of brush or timber.)
  4. Unit or tour leader must then file a 50-Miler Award application with the local council service center. This application gives additional details about planning the trip.


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75th Anniversary

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

2005 marked the 75th anniversary for Cub Scouts in the Boy Scouts of America (1930-2005). All Cub Scouts, Scout Leaders and family members during the Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary could earn Special Edition Awards. Each 75th Anniversary Award utilizes a special patch. Read about each Cub Scout 75th Anniversary Award to learn about the fun requirements for earning each award.

These awards need to be orderd through your local Council. Please check with them to ensure they have the awards available.

Requirements:


Youth Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. With an adult family member, talk to someone who was living in 1930 when Cub Scouting was founded. Find out what life was like for that person as a child - games played, subjects studied in school, family pastimes, and such. Draw a picture illustrating one of these activities.
  3. With your den or family members, take part in a skit, song, or ceremony or tell a story about the history of Cub Scouting or the values it represents.
  4. Make a puppet showing one of the characters from Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book. You can learn about these characters in the Cub Scout handbooks. Use your puppet in a puppet show.
  5. Draw an illustration of the United States flag as it looked in 1930. Explain what changes have been made in the flag since then and why. Tell how you can show respect for the flag.
  6. Participate in a pack, district or council derby. Decorate your entry to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.
  7. Choose a sport from the Cub Scout Academics & Sports program. Learn about someone who has played this sport during the past 75 years. Play the sport with your den, pack, friends, or family.
  8. Learn how some methods of transportation have changed in the past 75 years. Create a model or sculpture of one means of transportation that was used in 1930.
  9. List five methods of communication commonly used today. Tell how many of these existed in 1930. Use one method of communication to invite a non-Scouting friend to a 75th Anniversary activity and invite him to join.
  10. Design a greeting card for the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. Send the card to a friend or relative, with a note telling item about your favorite Cub Scout activities and why Cub Scouting is important to you.



Leader Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Create posters, fliers, or other media to promote 75th Anniversary celebration events at three den, pack, district, or council events.
  3. Serve on a committee in your pack, district, or council to plan an event to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting (different from activity 1).
  4. Learn about a game that boys played in 1930. Teach the game to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  5. Using materials that would have been available in 1930, teach a craft to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  6. Learn a song that was popular in 1930. Teach the song to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  7. Take photographs or write an article about how your den, pack, district, or council is celebrating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. Submit to a local newspaper for publication.
  8. Create a costume and wear it to tell a story about the history of Cub Scouting to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable. (Resources include youth handbooks and Cub Scout Leader Book.)
  9. Invite a career professional (firefighter, police officer, banker, retail professional, etc.) to speak at a Cub Scout activity or training event, highlighting how his/her profession has changed in the past 75 years.
  10. Read Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book to familiarize yourself with the characters Baden-Powell incorporated into Cub Scouting.



Family Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Invite another family to attend a 75th Anniversary event or activity to learn more about Cub Scouting and how to join.
  3. Visit a business, landmark, or other site or structure in your community that is at least 75 years old. Talk to a representative about how the location has changed in the past 75 years.
  4. As a family, make a list of household items that would not have existed 75 years ago. Discuss what might have been used instead and how life was different without these items.
  5. Bake a cake, pie, cookies, or other dessert using ingredients that would have been available 75 years ago. Decorate the dessert with a Cub Scout theme.
  6. Start a family scrapbook or add to an existing one. Include photographs or memorabilia from at least six different Scouting activities.
  7. Make a family time capsule with each family including items that represent what is important to him or her. Decide on a future date on which to open the capsule together.
  8. As a family, read an article together from Boy's Life magazine (accessible via the Internet at www.boyslife.org). Talk about how this article would have been different had it been written 75 years ago.
  9. Draw a family time line going back at least 75 years. Include significant dates such as birthdays, weddings, and when family members joined Scouting. Mark 1930 as the year Cub Scouting began.
  10. Find a picture or photograph of the Cub Scout uniform in 1930. Discuss how the uniform has changed. Have each family member draw a picture of what they think the Cub Scout uniform might look like 75 years in the future.



Pack Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Conduct an open house or recruiting event (an indoor event or help outdoors at a local park or other facility) to introduce new families to Cub Scouting and emphasize how Scouting's values have remained constant throughout Cub Scouting's 75-year history.
  3. Take part in a parade or other community event through which your pack can promote the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.
  4. Conduct a pack derby in which boys are encouraged to decorate entries with a 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting theme.
  5. Using the history of Cub Scouting as the theme, conduct an outdoor campfire program.
  6. Conduct a pack service project, such as Good Turn for America, that promotes and reinforces the concept of 75 years of Cub Scouts helping others. As a pack, contribute at least 75 hours of service.
  7. Work with your chartered organization to recognize Cub Scouting's 75th Anniversary in the organization's correspondence, newsletter, or other media.
  8. Prepare a photo display for your chartered organization or other community location, highlighting activities of your pack today and in years past. This may also include photos from other family members who were in Scouting.
  9. Appoint a pack historian to document pack events during the 75th Anniversary celebration. The historian may add to an existing scrapbook or history or may begin a scrapbook or other record that the pack can build on in the future.
  10. At your chartered organization, local park, or other community site, plant a tree to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.


Also available for the qualifying Cub Scout Pack is a special Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary Award Pack Ribbon.
 
 
Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary Award Patches

Unit Leaders can order the following items when requirements have been fulfilled for the special Cub Scout 75th Anniversary Awards

Item Number Description Price
75001 Youth Award—Patch with red border. For Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts. $3.95
75002 Leader Award—Patch with blue border. For any registered leader who works with Cub Scouts. $3.95
75003 Family Award—Patch with yellow border. For all Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and family members. $3.95
75004 Pack Award—Patch with silver border. For each youth and adult member of qualifying packs. $3.95
17836 Pack Award—Ribbon streamer for pack flag. $15.50 (pkg 10)

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Antarctic Scout

Intended for:Eagle Scouts
Details:

This program may not be available year to year. Check with your council or national headquarters for the latest news.

The Antarctic Scout joins a team of scientists conducting research during the Antarctic summer. This assignment adds value to the research team by providing assistance in accomplishing the team's missions. As a support member, the scout assists the scientists in the daily activities required to successfully conduct their field research projects. This includes any task from cooking and camp chores to scientific analysis of collected samples.

Historically, the Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts have alternated years sending an Eagle Scout or Gold Award winner to Antarctica.
These are journals from past Antarctic Boy Scouts:




These are the requirements for candidates for the Boy Scouts of America participation in the National Science Foundation and BSA scientific project to Antarctica.

  • The candidate must be a registered member of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • The candidate must have had a minimum of three years' membership in the BSA.
  • The candidate must be a high-school graduate and must be at least age 17 1/2 and not yet 21.
  • The candidate must have earned the Eagle Scout rank.
  • The applicant must be available for training during the month of September.


Candidates need to submit an Application Form to the BSA national headquarters before February 1.

See BSA page for more info. The medal and knot are not official BSA items and are not permitted to be worn on the official BSA uniform. Local councils may allow them to be worn.

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Arrow of Light

Intended for:Webelos Scouts
Details: The highest award in Cub Scouts is earned by Webelos that have been active participants in their den and are ready to join a Boy Scout troop. Many of the requirements for the Arrow of Light are intended to familiarize the scout with Boy Scouting and show him the next step to take in scouting. A scout earning the Arrow of Light patch has also completed nearly all Joining requirements for Boy Scouts so he has a headstart on his Boy Scout trail.
The award patch is worn as a Webelos scout and as a Boy Scout - adults wear the square knot symbol.
Knot Description: Red on green knot on tan background with yellow border.

Award Requirements:
  1. Be active in your Webelos den for at least six months since completing the fourth grade (or for at least six months since becoming 10 years old), and earn the Webelos badge.
  2. Show your knowledge of the requirements to become a Boy Scout by doing all of these:
    • Repeat from memory and explain in your own words the Scout Oath or Promise and the 12 points of the Scout Law. Tell how you have practiced them in your everyday life.
    • Give and explain the Scout motto, slogan, sign, salute, and handshake.
    • Understand the significance of the First Class Scout badge. Describe its parts and tell what each stands for.
    • Tell how a Boy Scout uniform is different from a Webelos Scout uniform.
    • Tie the joining knot (square knot)
    Use this handy Memorization Wheel to learn and review the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, Slogan, and Outdoor Code.
  3. Earn five more activity badges in addition to the three you already earned for the Webelos badge. These must include:
    • Fitness (already earned for the Webelos badge)
    • Citizen (already earned for the Webelos badge)
    • Readyman
    • Outdoorsman
    • At least one from the Mental Skills Group
    • At least one from the Technology Group
    • Two more of your choice
  4. With your Webelos den, visit at least
    • one Boy Scout troop meeting
    • one Boy Scout-oriented outdoor activity.
    • (If you have already done this when you earned your Outdoorsman activity badge, you may not use it to fulfill requirements for your Arrow of Light Award.)
  5. Participate in a Webelos overnight campout or day hike.
    (If you have already done this when you earned your Outdoorsman activity badge, you may not use it to fulfill requirements for your Arrow of Light Award requirements.)
  6. After you have completed all five of the above requirements, and after a talk with your Webelos den leader, arrange to visit, with your parent or guardian, a meeting of a Boy Scout troop you think you might like to join. Have a conference with the Scoutmaster.
  7. Complete the Honesty Character Connection.
    1. Know: Say the Cub Scout Promise to your family. Discuss these questions with them. What is a promise? What does it mean to keep your word? What does it mean to be trustworthy? What does honesty mean?
    2. Commit: Discuss these questions with your family. Why is a promise important? Why is it important for people to trust you when you give your word? When might it be difficult to be truthful? List examples.
    3. Practice: Discuss with a family member why it is important to be trustworthy and honest. How can you do your best to be honest even when it is difficult?

 
Online Webelos Arrow of Light Test
arrow of light award

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Boardsailing

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The BSA Boardsailing award has been developed to introduce Scouts to basic boardsailing skills, equipment, and safety precautions; to encourage the development of skills that promote fitness and safe aquatic recreation; and to lay a skill and knowledge foundation for those who will later participate in more advanced and demanding activities on the water. Boardsailing BSA is well suited as a program feature for older Scouts at summer camp.

Requirements
  1. Review the BSA guidelines for boardsailing and explain steps you have taken to follow each of the eleven guidelines found in Section V of Camp Program and Property Management, No. 20-920.(See below)
  2. Explain precautions to be taken for boardsailing on each of the following:
    1. Lakes
    2. Rivers
    3. Ocean or bay areas
  3. What is hypothermia? Describe to your counselor the symptoms of hypothermia. What special considerations in preventing hypothermia are necessary for boardsailing?
  4. Properly rig and prepare the sailboard you are using. Point out and explain the function of each of the following: uphaul, outhaul, downhaul, cleat, leach, tack, clew, foot, skeg, centerboard, wishbone boom, universal, luff, and center of effort. Explain how to steer the sailboard.
  5. Demonstrate your ability to uphaul the sail, find the neutral position to the wind (sail luffing), and control the board's position with foot movement.
  6. With supervision from your instructor, sail a course that involves beating, reaching, and running. Change tack by coming about.


Counselors
Anyone recognized and certified as an instructor by Windsurfer International or the United States Boardsailing Association may serve as a counselor for this award with the approval of the local council. Someone trained and experienced in boardsailing skills and safety may serve as a counselor for this award in a Scout summer camp program under the direction and supervision of a currently certified Aquatics Instructor, BSA. All requirements must be completed as stated on the Boardsailing BSA application. The counselor should not omit, vary, or add requirements. The requirements should be taught and completed in the order in which they are presented on the application.

Recognition
Scouts completing the requirements will receive a swimsuit patch, No. 00249. A completed award application should be submitted to the local council by the counselor or unit leader. The patch is not to be worn on the scout uniform.

Teaching Areas
Instruction must be conducted on a body of water meeting the criteria defined in the BSA guidelines for boardsailing. (See the "Aquatics" section of Camp Program and Property Management, No. 20-920.) A steady five- to seven-knot breeze is ideal for beginner practice. Initial water entry and practice should be on a gradual beach that meets Safe Swim Defense standards. The body of water should be free of other traffic, and be protected from shore and open water so that students are within fifty feet of assistance at all times during beginner instruction and practice.



Board Sailing Guidelines
Whenever Scouts or Explorers participate in boardsailing activities, the following guidelines and practices should be followed:
  1. A responsible adult must supervise all board-sailing activities. The supervising adult must be experienced and qualified in water safety (BSA Lifeguard, Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving, or YMCA Senior Lifesaver) and must be an experienced board sailor or use assistants with such qualifications.
  2. Only persons who have successfully completed the official BSA swimmers test in the current year may participate in a board-sailing activity.
  3. All participants must present evidence of fitness assured by a complete health history from a physician, parent, or legal guardian. The adult supervisor should adjust all supervision, discipline, and protection to anticipate any potential risks associated with individual health conditions. In the event of any significant health condition, an examination by a physician should be required by the adult supervisor.
  4. All participants should receive instruction in boardsailing skills and safety from an experienced board sailor.
  5. All persons must wear an approved U.S. Coast Guard personal flotation device (type II or III recommended) at all times while participating in a board-sailing activity.
  6. No one sails alone; always have a buddy on the water (in a boat or on another board). Board sailors must stay within view and easy rescue range of lookout in an appropriately equipped rescue boat.
  7. No board-sailing at night, at dusk, or in rough water. Weather and water conditions must be known and understood in advance of any board-sailing activity, and weather forecasts should be studied. Exposure suits are recommended for cool water or cool weather.
  8. Avoid swimming areas, fishermen, and underwater diving activity. Use designated board-sailing beaches when available. Stay out of traffic or channels that have heavy traffic.
  9. All equipment should be safety checked and repaired as needed before each use.
  10. When in difficulty, a person should stay with the board and not attempt to swim ashore.
  11. All participants should know, understand, and follow the rules and procedures for safe board-sailing. The supervisor should encourage the individual exercise of good judgment and self-discipline, and assure that safety rules are fairly and constantly enforced.


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Boy Scout Conservation Good Turn

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
Conservation has always been an integral part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Scouts have rendered distinguished public service by helping to conserve wildlife, energy, forests, soil, and water. Past generations of Scouts have been widely recognized for undertaking conservation Good Turn action projects in their local communities.

The Conservation Good Turn is an opportunity for Boy Scout troops to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

Conservation projects should involve the entire troop - scouts, leaders, and family members. Hands-on projects help Boy Scouts realize that everyone can do things to care for the environment. Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

Agencies to contact for project ideas:
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • local City Works department
  • Audobon Society
  • Trout Unlimited

Some suggested projects could be:
  • Plant shrubs to provide food and cover for wildlife.
  • Conduct stream improvement projects to prevent erosion.
  • Plant tree seedlings as part of a managed forestry plan.
  • Assist a local agency with a trout stream restoration project.
  • Develop a nature trail in a public park.


The patch can be worn as a temporary insignia.


Pick up an application form from your local council office or
use this Application Form

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Boy Scout Nova

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

There are four topics for which Boy Scouts can earn Nova awards. The Nova patch is earned for the first award and then a pi (π) pin-on device that attaches to the patch is earned for each of the other three topics. The patch and three devices represent each of the four STEM topics—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Purchase a Nova awards guidebook, available through local Scout shops. The requirements can be completed with a parent or an adult leader as the counselor. Each guidebook includes a section for the counselor and mentor.


Boy Scuot NOVA Pi device
The award patch is a 'temporary' patch with a hangloop and should be displayed centered on the right pocket, hanging from the pocket button.

Shoot! - Science award.
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch about three hours total of science-related shows or documentaries that involve projectiles, aviation, weather, astronomy, or space technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least five questions or ideas from the show(s) you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about three hours total) about projectiles, aviation, space, weather, astronomy, or aviation or space technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about three hours total). Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article or show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE merit badge from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already used toward another Nova award.) After completion, discuss with your counselor how the merit badge you earned uses science.
  3. Archery

    Robotics

    Astronomy

    Shotgun Shooting

    Athletics

    Space Exploration

    Aviation

    Weather

    Rifle Shooting

  4. Complete ALL requirements for A or B:
    1. Simulations. Find and use a projectile simulation applet on the Internet (with your parent’s or guardian’s permission). Then design and complete a hands-on experiment to demonstrate projectile motion.
      1. Keep a record of the angle, time, and distance.
      2. Graph the results of your experiment. (Note: Using a high-speed camera or video camera may make the graphing easier, as will doing many repetitions using variable heights from which the projectile can be launched.)
      3. Discuss with your counselor:
        1. What a projectile is
        2. What projectile motion is
        3. The factors affecting the path of a projectile
        4. The difference between forward velocity and acceleration due to gravity
    2. Discover. Explain to your counselor the difference between escape velocity (not the game), orbital velocity, and terminal velocity. Then answer TWO of the following questions. (With your parent’s or guardian’s permission, you may explore websites to find this information.)
      1. Why are satellites usually launched toward the east, and what is a launch window?
      2. What is the average terminal velocity of a skydiver? (What is the fastest you would go if you were to jump out of an airplane?)
      3. How fast does a bullet, baseball, airplane, or rocket have to travel in order to escape Earth’s gravitational field? (What is Earth’s escape velocity?)
  5. Complete ALL requirements for A or B:
    1. Visit an observatory or a flight, aviation, or space museum.
      1. During your visit, talk to a docent or person in charge about a science topic related to the site.
      2. Discuss your visit with your counselor.
    2. Discover the latitude and longitude coordinates of your current position. Then do the following:
      1. Find out what time a satellite will pass over your area.
      2. Watch the satellite using binoculars. Record the time of your viewing, the weather conditions, how long the satellite was visible, and the path of the satellite. Then discuss your viewing with your counselor.
  6. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Design and build a catapult that will launch a marshmallow a distance of 4 feet. Then do the following:
      1. Keep track of your experimental data for every attempt. Include the angle of launch and the distance projected.
      2. Make sure you apply the same force every time, perhaps by using a weight to launch the marshmallow. Discuss your design, data, and experiments—both successes and failures - with your counselor.
    2. Design a pitching machine that will lob a softball into the strike zone. Answer the following questions, then discuss your design, data, and experiments - both successes and failures—with your counselor.
      1. At what angle and velocity will your machine need to eject the softball in order for the ball to travel through the strike zone from the pitcher’s mound?
      2. How much force will you need to apply in order to power the ball to the plate?
      3. If you were to use a power supply for your machine, what power source would you choose and why?
    3. Design and build a marble run or roller coaster that includes an empty space where the marble has to jump from one part of the chute to the other. Do the following, then discuss your design, data, and experiments—both successes and failures—with your counselor.
      1. Keep track of your experimental data for every attempt. Include the vertical angle between the two parts of the chute and the horizontal distance between the two parts of the chute.
      2. Experiment with different starting heights for the marble. How do the starting heights affect the velocity of the marble? How does the starting height affect the jump distance?
  7. Discuss with your counselor how science affects your everyday life.

 

Start Your Engines! - Technology award.
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch about three hours total of technology-related shows or documentaries that involves transportation or transportation technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about three hours total) about transportation or transportation technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about three hours total). Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article or show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE merit badge from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already used toward another Nova award.) After completion, discuss with your counselor how the merit badge you earned uses technology.
  3. Automotive Maintenance

    Farm Mechanics

    Aviation

    Motorboating

    Canoeing

    Nuclear Science

    Cycling

    Railroading

    Drafting

    Small - Boat Sailing

    Electricity

    Space Exploration

    Energy

    Truck Transportation

  4. Do ALL of the following.
    1. Using the requirements from the above list of merit badges:
      1. Tell your counselor the energy source(s) used in these merit badges.
      2. Discuss the pros and cons of each energy source with your counselor.
    2. Make a list of sources of energy that may be possible to use in transportation.
    3. With your counselor:
      1. Discuss alternative sources of energy.
      2. Discuss the pros and cons of using alternative energy sources.
  5. Design and build a working model vehicle (not from a kit).
    1. Make drawings and specifications of your model vehicle before you begin to build.
    2. Include one of the following energy sources to power your vehicle (do not use gasoline or other combustible fuel source): solar power, wind power, or battery power.
    3. Test your model. Then answer the following questions:
      1. How well did it perform?
      2. Did it move as well as you thought it would?
      3. Did you encounter problems? How can these problems be corrected?
    4. Discuss with your counselor:
      1. Any difficulties you encountered in designing and building your model
      2. Why you chose a particular energy source
      3. Whether your model met your specifications
      4. How you would modify your design to make it better
  6. Discuss with your counselor how technology affects your everyday life.

 

Whoosh! - Engineering award.
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch about three hours total of engineering-related shows or documentaries that involve motion or motion-inspired technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about three hours total) about motion or motion-inspired technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about three hours total). Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article or show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Choose ONE merit badge from the following list. (Choose one you have not already used for another Nova award.) After completion, discuss with your counselor how the merit badge you earned uses engineering.
  3. Archery

    Inventing

    Aviation

    Model Design and Building

    Composite Materials

    Railroading

    Drafting

    Rifle Shooting

    Electronics

    Robotics

    Engineering

    Shotgun Shooting

  4. Do ALL of the following:
    1. Make a list or drawing of the six simple machines.
    2. Be able to tell your counselor the name of each machine and how each machine works.
    3. Discuss the following with your counselor:
      1. The simple machines that were involved with the motion in your chosen merit badge (Hint: Look at the moving parts of an engine to find simple machines.)
      2. The energy source causing the motion for the subject of your merit badge
      3. What you learned about motion from earning your merit badge
  5. Complete ALL requirements for A or B:
    1. Visit an amusement park. Then discuss the following with your counselor:
      1. The simple machines present in at least two of the rides
      2. The forces involved in the motion of any two rides
    2. Visit a playground. Then discuss the following with your counselor:
      1. The simple machines present in the playground equipment
      2. The forces involved in the motion of any two playground fixtures
  6. Do the following:
    1. On your own, design one of the following and include a drawing or sketch: an amusement park ride OR a playground fixture OR a method of transportation.
    2. Discuss with your counselor:
      1. The simple machines present in your design
      2. The energy source powering the motion of your creation
  7. Discuss with your counselor how engineering affects your everyday life.

 

Designed to Crunch! - Mathematics award.
  1. Complete ALL the requirements for A, B, C, or D:
    1. Watch about three hours total math-related shows or documentaries that involve scientific models and modeling, physics, sports equipment design, bridge building, or cryptography. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least five questions or ideas from the show(s) you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor
    2. Research (about three hours total) several websites (with your parent’s or guardian’s permission) that discuss and explain cryptography or the discoveries of people who worked extensively with cryptography. Then do the following:
      1. List and record the URLs of the websites you visited and the major topics covered on the websites you visited. (You may use the copy and paste function—eliminate the words—if you include your sources.)
      2. Discuss with your counselor how cryptography is used in the military and in everyday life and how a cryptographer uses mathematics.
    3. Read at least three articles (about three hours total) about physics, math, modeling, or cryptography. You may wish to read about how technology and engineering are changing sports equipment, how and why triangles are used in construction, bridge building, engineering, climate and/or weather models, how banks keep information secure, or about the stock market. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    4. Do a combination of reading, watching, or researching (about three hours total). Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from each article, website, or show.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or questions with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE merit badge from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already used toward another Nova award.) After completion, discuss with your counselor how the merit badge you earned uses mathematics.
  3. American Business

    Orienteering

    Chess

    Personal Management

    Computers

    Radio

    Drafting

    Surveying

    Entrepreneurship

    Weather

  4. Choose TWO from A or B or C or D or E and complete ALL the requirements. (Write down your data and calculations to support your explanation to your counselor. You may use a spreadsheet. Do not use someone else’s data or calculations.)
    1. Calculate your horsepower when you run up a flight of stairs.
      1. How does your horsepower compare to the power of a horse?
      2. How does your horsepower compare to the horsepower of your favorite car?

      Share your calculations with your counselor, and discuss what you learned about horsepower.

    2. Attend at least two track, cross-country, or swim meets.
      1. For each meet, time at least three racers. (Time the same racers at each meet.)
      2. Calculate the average speed of the racers you timed. (Make sure you write down your data and calculations.)
      3. Compare the average speeds of your racers to each other, to the official time, and to their times at the two meets you attended.

      Share your calculations with your counselor, and discuss your conclusions about the racers’ strengths and weaknesses.

    3. Attend a soccer, baseball, softball, or basketball game. Choose two players and keep track of their efforts during the game. (Make sure you write down your data and calculations.) Calculate their statistics using the following as examples:
      1. Soccer—Goals, assists, corner kicks, keeper saves, fouls, offsides
      2. Baseball or softball—Batting average, runs batted in, fielding statistics, pitching statistics
      3. Basketball—Points, baskets attempted, rebounds, steals, turnovers, and blocked shots

      Share your calculations with your counselor, and discuss your conclusions about the players’ strengths and weaknesses.

    4. Attend a football game or watch one on TV. (This is a fun activity to do with a parent or friend! ) Keep track of the efforts of your favorite team during the game. (Make sure you write down your data and calculations.) Calculate your team’s statistics using the following as examples:
      1. Kicks/punts
        1. Kickoff—Kick return yards
        2. Punt—Number, yards
        3. Field goals—Attempted, percent completed, yards
        4. Extra point—Attempted, percent completed
      2. Offense
        1. Number of first downs
        2. Forward passes—Attempted, percent completed, total length of passes, longest pass, number and length of passes caught by each receiver, yardage gained by each receiver after catching a pass
        3. Running plays—Number, yards gained or lost for each run, longest run from scrimmage line, total yards gained or lost, and number of touchdowns
      3. Defense—Number of quarterback sacks, interceptions turnovers, and safeties

      Share your calculations with your counselor, and discuss your conclusions about your team’s strengths and weaknesses.

    5. How starry are your nights? Participate in a star count to find out. This may be done alone but is more fun with a group. Afterward, share your results with your counselor.
      1. Visit NASA’s Student Observation Network website at www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/son/energy/starcount/ for instructions on performing a star count.
      2. Do a star count on five clear nights at the same time each night.
      3. Report your results on NASA’s Student Observation Network website and see how your data compares to others.
  5. Do ALL of the following.
    1. Investigate your calculator and explore the different functions.
    2. Discuss the functions, abilities, and limitations of your calculator with your counselor. Talk about how these affect what you can and cannot do with a calculator. (See your counselor for some ideas to consider.)
  6. Discuss with your counselor how math affects your everyday life.

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Boy Scout World Conservation

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Boy Scouts to 'think globally' and 'act locally' to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources and that we are interdependent with our world environment.
The design of the badge incorporates the panda logo of the World Wildlife Fund, which sponsers the Award on a worldwide basis with the fleur-de-lis, which is found on or as the basis for many nation's Scouting emblems. The World Conservation Award is earned by Scouts and Venturers in many other nations outside of the United States.

If a Cub Scout earned the Cub Scout version of this badge, he may not transfer it to his Boy Scout uniform - he must earn the award as a Boy Scout.

Earn the Boy Scout World Conservation Award by earning the following merit badges:
The World Conservation Award is worn on the uniform shirt, centered on the right pocket as a TEMPORARY patch. Only ONE Temporary patch may be worn at a time.

Download or complete this Application Form

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BSA Family

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

The BSA Family Award program offers activities to help strengthen all families - whether two-parent, single-parent, or nontraditional. This program helps families accomplish worthy goals while building and strengthening relationships among family members. All family members are encouraged to participate and may earn the award.

Some packs, through a volunteer family program chair, actively encourage and support families pursuing this award. If your pack does not promote and support the family program, your family may still participate on its own. The BSA Family Activity Book (available at your local council service center) gives all the requirements as well as step-by-step instructions for earning the BSA Family Award.

BSA Family award

To earn the award, a family must complete 10 activities within a 12-month period. The family chooses one activity in two topics in each of the following categories:

  • Learning Through Fun and Adventure
  • Strengthening Family Relationships
  • Developing Personal Strengths
  • Teaching Responsibility
  • Handling Difficult Situations

When a family has completed the requirements, all family members are eligible to receive an award certificate, patches for uniform wear, and/or pins for non-uniform wear.
The patch is a temporary emblem to be displayed centered on the right pocket or on a patch vest.

The BSA Family Activity Book is the primary resource for the BSA Family Award program. It is filled with suggested activities to enhance the children's personal development and enrich and strengthen the family.

The BSA Family Activity Book is divided into five categories that include several topics of interest to families. Each topic contains suggested activities for a family to do together. These activities could include going on field trips; telling stories; doing arts and crafts projects; playing games; participating in family discussions; or making lists, charts, and scrapbooks.

cub scout family award

Most of the ideas in the BSA Family Activity Book will be useful during family meetings or gatherings. However, parents will also find ways to incorporate them into daily life. Many ideas may be adapted for use while riding in a car and during mealtimes, and may provide things to occupy children when they say there is "nothing to do." In short, parents may use the ideas and activities to meet their own family's needs and interests.

Included with most topics are recommended books for adults and children to read together. One can find these (or other books) at a local public library. Adults and children may take turns reading aloud. There are many wonderful books to help explain or illustrate any topic the family explores.

The BSA Family Activity Book is available at your local council service center or wherever Scouting merchandise is sold. Visit www.scoutstuff.org to find a list of Scouting retailers in your area.


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BSA Lifeguard

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

The BSA Lifeguard patch is worn on the right side of your BSA swimsuit, not on your scout uniform.

Download the Application Form

PREREQUISITES:
Before doing requirements 6 through 25, complete the following:
  1. Submit proof of age. You must be at least 15 years old to participate.
  2. Submit written evidence of fitness for swimming activities (signed health history).
  3. Swim continuously for 550 yards, including at least 100 yards each of the following strokes in good form: front crawl, breaststroke, elementary backstroke, and sidestroke.
  4. Immediately following the above swim, tread water for two minutes.
  5. Starting in the water, swim 20 yards using a front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive 7 to 10 feet, retrieve a 10-pound object, surface, swim with the object 20 yards back to the starting point, and exit the water, all within 1 minute, 40 seconds.

REQUIREMENTS:
Complete the following requirements within a 120-day period:
  1. Show evidence of current training in American Red Cross First Aid and American Red Cross CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer or equivalent (includes any training for a camp health officer recognized by BSA national camp standards).
  2. Demonstrate reaching assists from the deck using an arm, a rescue tube, and a pole.
  3. Demonstrate throwing assists using a throw bag and a ring buoy with line attached. Throw each device such that the line lands within reach of a conscious subject 30 feet from shore.
  4. Demonstrate:
    1. Rescue of a conscious subject in deep water using a rescue board, kayak, rowboat, canoe, or other rescue craft that would be available at your local facility.
    2. Repeat for an unconscious subject.
  5. Demonstrate an entry and front approach with a rescue tube to a conscious subject in deep water 30 feet away from shore. Position the rescue tube to support the subject and then assist the subject to safety, providing direction and reassurance throughout.
  6. Demonstrate an entry and rear approach with a rescue tube to a conscious subject in deep water 30 feet away from shore. Secure and support the subject from behind and then move the subject to safety, providing direction and reassurance throughout.
  7. Demonstrate use of a rescue tube to assist two subjects grasping each other. Secure, support, and reassure both subjects. With the assistance of a second guard, calm and separate the subjects and move them to safety.
  8. Demonstrate both front and rear head-hold escapes from a subject's grasp.
  9. Demonstrate a feet-first entry in deep water with a rescue tube and swim an approach stroke 25 yards within 25 seconds while trailing the tube.
  10. Demonstrate an entry and front approach with a rescue tube to a face-down passive subject 30 feet away at or near the surface in deep water. Use a wrist roll to position the subject face-up on the rescue tube, tow them to safety, and remove them from the water with assistance within two minutes. Immediately perform a primary assessment and demonstrate one-person CPR for three minutes.
  11. Demonstrate an entry and rear approach with a rescue tube to a face-down unconscious subject 30 feet away at or near the surface in deep water. Position the subject face-up, tow them to safety, and remove them from the water with assistance within two minutes. Immediately perform a primary assessment and demonstrate two-person CPR for three minutes.
  12. Demonstrate in-water ventilation of an unconscious subject when prompt removal from the water is not possible. Open the airway, position the mask, and simulate ventilations.
  13. Demonstrate an entry and approach with a rescue tube for use when an unconscious subject is submerged face-down at or near the bottom in 6 to 8 feet of water. Bring the subject to the surface and tow to the nearest point of safety.
  14. Remove a subject from the water using each of the following techniques in the appropriate circumstances with the aid of a second rescuer:
    1. Vertical lift at the edge of a pool or pier using a backboard
    2. Walking assist
    3. Beach drag
  15. Participate in multiple-rescuer search techniques appropriate for a missing subject in murky water:
    1. Line search in shallow water
    2. Underwater line search in deep water without equipment
    3. Underwater line search in deep water with mask and fins
  16. Demonstrate in-line stabilization for a face-down subject with suspected spinal injury in very shallow water (18 inches or less).
  17. Demonstrate in-line stabilization for a suspected spinal injury in shallow water (waist to chest deep):
    1. For a face-up subject
    2. For a face-down subject
  18. Demonstrate in-line stabilization for a suspected spinal injury in deep water, swim the subject to shallow water, confirm vital signs, and with the assistance of three others, remove the subject from the water using a backboard with straps and a head immobilization device.
  19. Demonstrate care for a spinal injury on land in the following situations:
    1. Non-standing subject
    2. Standing subject including securing to a backboard and lowering to the ground
  20. Correctly answer 80 percent of the questions on the BSA Lifeguard knowledge test covering the course material. Review any incomplete or incorrect answers.
  21. Serve as a lifeguard, under supervision, for at least two separate BSA swimming activities for a combined time of two hours. Afterward, discuss the experience with the lifeguarding instructor.

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Centennial Quality Unit

Intended for:All Scouts
Notes:This program has been replaced by the Journey to Excellence program starting in 2011.
Details:

The Centennial Quality Awards program is designed to recognize units, districts, councils, areas, and regions for achieving excellence in providing a quality program to a growing youth population in America at all levels of the Boy Scouts of America.

The Centennial Quality Award is named in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
The award began in 2007 and continues until 2010. Each year that you qualify, you will qualify to receive recognition for that year.
There was a red background in 2007, a white background in 2008, a blue background in 2009, and 2010 will have a red, white, and blue background.

Special note: If earned all four years, a special distinction will be available to recognize groups who qualify in 2010.

The award patch is displayed on the uniform's right sleeve below the patrol emblem or den numeral. Only the most recent year's patch is worn, not a string of past year patches.

centennial quality unit award
2007 quality unit award
2008 quality unit award
2009 quality unit award
2010 quality unit award

The BSA National Strategic Plan is guided by five pillars supported by measurable, specific goals. The plan requires immediate and continued attention to each pillar. Each year there will be an emphasis on one of the pillars.

  • 2006—Emphasized research in guiding our movement.
  • 2007—Focused on helping every local council to become fiscally sound.
  • 2008—Launch a campaign to engage 1 million new volunteers.
  • 2009—Salute chartered organizations and strategic alliances and highlight our tradition of service.
  • 2010—Celebrate our 100th anniversary.


See BSA Info page for award details, commitment forms, achievement forms, order forms, and FAQ pages.


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Crime Prevention

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

The Boy Scouts of America's Crime Prevention Program assists neighborhoods and communities in their efforts to prevent crime by emphasizing youth, family, and community.

The Crime Prevention Award
Recognitions consisting of patches, wallet cards, certificates, and pins are available. All participants, including those not registered in Scouting, are eligible to earn the Crime Prevention Award provided they fulfill the requirements of the two phases outlined below and detailed on the application form.

January, 2007: I contacted BSA National about this award after hearing from someone that they could not get the patch locally. BSA replied that the Crime Prevention emblem IS in stock, however, this is a restricted item and can only be obtained through your local council. If your council does not have this in stock, they can order it. It is item #04189.

Phase I-Youth and Family
Youth and family members fulfill this phase of the award by completing the activities outlined on the application form for this phase, and having a parent and/or unit leader sign the application form afterward.

Phase II-Youth and Unit
This phase of the award is completed by:

  1. Securing the approval of a unit leader for a crime prevention project, either an original project or a project of a neighborhood- or community-based organization;
  2. Participating with your unit, den, patrol, friends, family, neighborhood, or community in the crime prevention project; and
  3. Having a parent and/or unit leader sign the application form afterward.

Once both phases have been completed, the unit leader must sign the application. Awards may be purchased at the local council service center.

Download the Cub Scout Application Form
or the Boy Scout Application Form.


Information for the Parent or Unit Leader

Youth
When working on crime prevention with youth, help them learn the importance of the following:

  • Settle arguments with words, not fists or weapons. Do not stand around and watch while others are arguing; violence often spreads into groups of bystanders.
  • Learn safe routes and good places to find help in the neighborhood. Trust your feelings; if you sense danger, get away fast. Report any crimes or suspicious actions or individuals to the police, school authorities, or parents.
  • Do not open the door to anyone you do not know and trust. Never go anywhere with someone you do not know and trust.
  • Whenever you leave home, tell parents, relatives, or other responsible adults where you are going, who you will be with, and when you expect to be home.
  • Do not use alcohol or other drugs.
  • Stick with friends who are not violent and who do not use alcohol or drugs. Avoid known 'trouble spots' and difficult situations.
  • If someone tries to abuse you or touch you inappropriately, yell no, get away, and tell a trusted adult.
  • Get involved in making your neighborhood safer. Join with your neighbors, neighborhood associations, and local schools in these efforts.
  • Help teach younger children how to avoid being victims of crime. Set a good example for them, and explain why it's important to be safe.

Family
Addressing crime prevention through families is one of the most effective ways to combat the problem. Here are some important topics for family or one-on-one discussion:

  • Children need to feel that someone cares enough to protect them. Adults need to set limits, rules, and standards for children. Discuss the reasons for and importance of these boundaries.
  • Children need to talk about violent situations they might witness or be involved in. How might such violent situations be avoided? How can children prevent such situations from happening to themselves or their family and friends? What is a loving and supportive environment, and how is it created?
  • Why is it important to be trustworthy? How does someone earn a reputation for trustworthiness? How does someone lose that reputation, and what does it feel like? Discuss how one small violation of trust can lead to larger ethical compromises.
  • Is it right to 'narc on' someone you know? How does silence allow crime to flourish? Discuss ways to tell the truth about someone else's actions without suffering reprisals. Give examples.
  • It can be difficult to develop a sense of respect and appreciation for one's family, community, and world. Discuss focusing on positive things-not just problems.

The following strategies and projects can involve individuals or whole families in preventing crime:

  • Don't keep or temporarily place weapons where children have access to them. A parent's attitude and example can be extremely influential when it comes to weapons.
  • Get to know neighbors and help your children develop trust with them. Increase the awareness of everyone in your neighborhood of situations that could attract crime - for example, empty houses, open garage doors, unaccompanied children.
  • Stay in touch with your children and have them stay in touch with you. Teach them how to contact you and how to find another trusted adult any time they need help.
  • Offer the use of your home as a refuge and a reliable source of help for children who are frightened or need assistance.
  • Organize, join, or participate in your neighborhood's or community's crime watch efforts. Help educate others about crime prevention.

Neighborhood/Community
When you focus on community crime prevention, consider participating in the following programs:

  • Neighborhood watch
  • Child identification
  • The McGruff program
  • Safety for the elderly
  • Local police or sheriff's department initiatives
  • Church- or school-based anticrime initiatives

Consider these suggestions for crime prevention projects:

  • Work with local schools and parks to establish drug-free, weapon-free zones. Build a partnership with police. Focus on solving problems instead of reacting to crises.
  • Help develop community pride by cleaning up the neighborhood. Involve the whole community. Contact the departments of public works or parks and recreation for specific ideas, guidance, or suggestions.
  • Build a phone list of local organizations that offer counseling, job training, guidance, and other services that provide positive options to at-risk youth and families. Distribute the list in your neighborhood using local libraries, recreation centers, and other facilities.



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Cub Scout Conservation Good Turn

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
Conservation has always been an integral part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Scouts have rendered distinguished public service by helping to conserve wildlife, energy, forests, soil, and water. Past generations of Scouts have been widely recognized for undertaking conservation Good Turn action projects in their local communities.

The Conservation Good Turn is an opportunity for Cub Scout packs to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

Conservation projects should involve the entire Cub Scout pack - scouts, leaders, and family members. Hands-on projects help Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts realize that everyone can do things to care for the environment. Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

Agencies to contact for project ideas:
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • local City Works department
  • Audobon Society
  • Trout Unlimited

Some suggested projects could be:
  • Plant grasses, trees, shrubs, and ground cover to stop soil erosion.
  • As a den or pack, adopt a park and keep it clean.
  • Organize or participate in a recycling program.
  • Participate in a beach or waterfront cleanup. Record the items collected and determine the possible harmful effects to wildlife.
  • Establish a nature trail, plant vegetation, or carry out other needed projects as requested by the camp ranger at a local BSA camp property.


The patch can be worn as a temporary insignia or on the scout's patch vest.


Pick up an application form from your local council office or
use this Application Form

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Cub Scout Nova

Intended for:Wolf Scouts, Bear Scouts, Webelos Scouts
Details:(the National BSA office has told me that Tiger scouts may not earn any Nova awards)

There are four topics for which Cub Scouts can earn Nova awards. The Nova patch is earned for the first award and then a pi (π) pin-on device that attaches to the patch is earned for each of the other three topics. The patch and three devices represent each of the four STEM topics—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Purchase a Nova awards guidebook, available through local Scout shops. The requirements can be completed with a parent or an adult leader as the counselor. Each guidebook includes a section for the counselor and mentor.


Cub Scout NOVA Pi device
The award patch is a 'temporary' patch with a hangloop and should be displayed centered on the right pocket, hanging from the pocket button.

Science Everywhere - Science award
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE belt loop or pin from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.)
  3. Astronomy

    Nutrition

    Collecting

    Pet Care

    Geography

    Photography

    Geology

    Science

    Map and Compass

    Weather

    Mathematics

    Wildlife Conservation

  4. Act like a scientist! Do EACH of the following:
    1. With your counselor, choose a question you would like to investigate.
      Here are some examples only (you may get other ideas from your belt loop or pin activities):
      1. Why do rockets have fins? Is there any connection between the feathers on arrows and fins on rockets?
      2. Why do some cars have spoilers? How do spoilers work?
      3. If there is a creek or stream in your neighborhood, where does it go? Does your stream flow to the Atlantic or the Pacific ocean?
      4. Is the creek or stream in your neighborhood or park polluted?
      5. What other activity can you think of that involves some kind of scientific questions or investigation?
    2. With a parent or your counselor, use the scientific method/process to investigate your question. Keep records of your question, the information you found, how you investigated, and what you found out about your question.
    3. Discuss your investigation and findings with your counselor.
  5. Visit a place where science is being done, used, or explained, such as one of the following: zoo, aquarium, water treatment plant, observatory, science museum, weather station, fish hatchery, or any other location where science is being done, used, or explained.
    1. During your visit, talk to someone in charge about science.
    2. Discuss with your counselor the science done, used, or explained at the place you visited.
  6. Discuss with your counselor how science affects your everyday life.

 

Tech Talk - Technology award
  1. Look up a definition of the word technology and discuss the meaning with your counselor.
  2. Discuss EACH of the following with your counselor.
    1. How technology is used in EACH of the following fields:
      1. Communication
      2. Business
      3. Construction
      4. Sports
      5. Entertainment
    2. Tell why technology is important.
  3. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  4. Complete ONE belt loop or pin from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.)
  5. AstronomyMathematics
    BB-gun ShootingMusic
    BicyclingPhotography
    BowlingSnow Ski and Board Sports
    ComputersVideo Games
    Map and Compass
  6. What technology is used in your belt loop or pin?
    1. Discuss with your counselor how you think this technology:
      1. Was invented
      2. Could be made better
    2. Discuss your ideas about technology with your counselor.
  7. Visit a place where technology is being designed, used, or explained, such as one of the following: an amusement park, a police or fire station, a radio or television station, a newspaper office, a factory or store, or any other location where technology is being designed, used, or explained.
    1. During your visit, talk to someone in charge about the following:
      1. The technologies used where you are visiting
      2. Why the organization is using these technologies
    2. Discuss with your counselor the technology that is designed, used, or explained at the place you visited.
  8. Discuss with your counselor how technology affects your everyday life.

 

Swing! - Engineering award
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE belt loop or pin from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.)
  3. BadmintonMathematics
    BaseballSoftball
    BB-gun ShootingTable Tennis
    FishingTennis
    GolfUltimate
    Hockey
  4. Levers
    1. Make a list or drawing of the three types of levers. (A lever is one kind of simple machine.)
    2. Be able to tell your counselor:
      1. The class of each lever
      2. How each lever works
    3. With your counselor, discuss:
      1. The type of lever that is involved with the motion for the belt loop or pin you chose for requirement 2
      2. What you learned about levers and motion from earning your belt loop or pin
      3. Why we use levers
  5. Do the following:
    1. Visit a place that uses levers, such as a playground, carpentry shop, construction site, restaurant kitchen, or any other location that uses levers.
    2. Discuss with your counselor the equipment or tools that use levers in the place you visited.
  6. Do EACH of the following:
    1. On your own, design, including a drawing, sketch, or model, ONE of the following:
      1. A playground fixture that uses a lever
      2. A game or sport that uses a lever
      3. An invention that uses a lever
    2. Discuss with your counselor how the lever in your design will move something.
  7. Discuss with your counselor how levers affect your everyday life.

 

1-2-3 Go! - Mathematics award
  1. Complete ALL requirements for A, B, or C:
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete the Mathematics OR Computers pin.
  3. Choose TWO options from A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements for those options. Keep your work to share with your counselor. The necessary information to make your calculations can be found in a book or on the Internet. (See the Helpful Links box for ideas.) You may work with a parent or your counselor on these calculations.
    1. Choose TWO of the following places and calculate how much you would weigh there.
      1. On the sun or the moon
      2. On Jupiter or Pluto
      3. On a planet that you choose
    2. Choose ONE of the following and calculate its height:
      1. A tree
      2. Your house
      3. A building of your choice
    3. Calculate the volume of air in your bedroom. Make sure your measurements have the same units—all feet or all inches—and show your work.

    Volume = Length × Width × Height

  4. Secret Codes
    1. Look up, then discuss with your counselor each of the following:
      1. Cryptography
      2. At least three ways secret codes or ciphers are made
      3. How secret codes and ciphers relate to mathematics
    2. Design a secret code or cipher. Then do the following:
      1. Write a message in your code or cipher.
      2. Share your code or cipher with your counselor.
  5. Discuss with your counselor how math affects your everyday life.


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Cub Scout Outdoor Activity

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

Cub Scouts at all levels from Tiger to Webelos can earn the Outdoor Activity Award. When the award is first earned, the scout receives the pocket flap award, worn on the right pocket flap of his uniform. In each additional year that he earns the award, a wolf track pin is attached to the flap. The Summertime Pack Award pin should be pinned through this patch just like the wolf track pins.
Successive years should build on skills and experiences from earlier years, having the scouts participate in more extensive activities.

Requirements:
Scouts at all ranks must attend Cub Scout day camp or Cub Scout/Webelos Scout resident camp in the current program year.

Tiger Cubs
Complete one requirement in Achievement 5, 'Let's Go Outdoors' (Tiger Cub Handbook) and complete three of the outdoor activities listed below.

Wolf Cub Scouts
Assemble the 'Six Essentials for Going Outdoors' (Wolf Handbook, Elective 23b) and discuss their purpose, and complete four of the outdoor activities listed below.

Bear Cub Scouts
Earn the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Award (Bear Handbook, Elective 25h) and complete five of the outdoor activities listed below.

Webelos Scouts
Earn the Outdoorsman Activity Badge (Webelos Handbook) and complete six of the outdoor activities listed below.

Outdoor Activities:
With your den, pack, or family:
  1. Participate in a nature hike in your local area. This can be on an organized, marked trail, or just a hike to observe nature in your area.
  2. Participate in an outdoor activity such as a picnic or park fun day.
  3. Explain the buddy system and tell what to do if lost. Explain the importance of cooperation.
  4. Attend a pack overnighter. Be responsible by being prepared for the event.
  5. Complete an outdoor service project in your community.
  6. Complete a nature/conservation project in your area. This project should involve improving, beautifying, or supporting natural habitats. Discuss how this project helped you to respect nature.
  7. Earn the Summertime Pack Award.
  8. Participate in a nature observation activity. Describe or illustrate and display your observations at a den or pack meeting.
  9. Participate in an outdoor aquatic activity. This can be an organized swim meet or just a den or pack swim.
  10. Participate in an outdoor campfire program. Perform in a skit, sing a song, or take part in a ceremony.
  11. Participate in an outdoor sporting event.
  12. Participate in an outdoor Scout's Own or other worship service.
  13. Explore a local city, county, state, or national park. Discuss with your den how a good citizen obeys the park rules.


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Cub Scout Supernova

Intended for:Wolf Scouts, Bear Scouts
Details:

The Cub Scout Supernova award can be earned by Wolf or Bear Cub Scouts active with a den. Tiger Cubs are not eligible to earn the Cub Scout Supernova award. With help from your parents and unit leader, select a council-approved mentor who is a registered Scouter. Your mentor may not be your parent or unit leader (unless the mentor is working with more than one youth).

Purchase a Nova awards guidebook, available through local Scout shops. Each guidebook includes a section for the counselor and mentor.



Requirements:
  1. Earn the Science AND Mathematics Cub Scout academic pins.
  2. Earn THREE of the following Cub Scout academic pins: Astronomy, Computers, Geography, Geology, Map and Compass, Nutrition, Pet Care, Photography, Reading and Writing, Video Games, Weather, and Wildlife Conservation.
  3. Find interesting facts about Dr. Luis W. Alvarez using resources in your school or local library or on the Internet (with your parent's or guardian's permission and guidance). Then discuss what you learn with your mentor, including answers to the following questions: What very important award did Dr. Alvarez earn? What was his famous theory about dinosaurs?
  4. Find out about three other famous scientists, technology innovators, engineers, or mathematicians approved by your mentor. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  5. Speak with your teacher(s) at school (or your parents if you are home-schooled) OR one of your Cub Scout leaders about your interest in earning the Cub Scout Supernova award. Ask them why they think math and science are important in your education. Discuss what you learn with your mentor.
  6. Participate in a science project or experiment in your classroom or school OR do a special science project approved by your teacher. Discuss this activity with your mentor.
  7. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit with someone who works in a STEM-related career. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
    2. Learn about a career that depends on knowledge about science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  8. Learn about the scientific method (or scientific process). Discuss this with your mentor, and include a simple demonstration to show what you learned.
  9. Participate in a Nova- or other STEM-related activity in your Cub Scout den or pack meeting that is conducted by a Boy Scout or Venturer who is working on his or her Supernova award. If this is not possible, participate in another Nova- or STEM-related activity in your den or pack meeting.
  10. Submit an application for the Cub Scout Supernova award to the district Nova or advancement committee for approval.

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Cub Scout World Conservation

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Cub Scouts to 'think globally' and 'act locally' to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources and that we are interdependent with our world environment.

The Cub Scout version of the World Conservation Award can be earned by Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scouts, but not by Tigers.

This is considered a 'temporary patch' and should be displayed centered on the right pocket. It can be sewn on or displayed in a plastic patch holder hung from the pocket button.

This award can be earned only once while you are in Cub Scouting
(i.e. as either a Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scout).

As a Wolf Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #7 - Your Living World
  • Complete all Arrow Points in 2 of the following 3 Electives:
    • #13 - Birds
    • #15 - Grow Something
    • #19 - Fishing
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above


As a Bear Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #5 - Sharing Your World with Wildlife
  • Complete all requirements in 2 of the following 3 electives:
    • #2 - Weather
    • #12 - Nature Crafts
    • #15 - Water and Soil Conservation
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above.


As a Webelos Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Earn the Forester activity badge.
  • Earn the Naturalist activity badge.
  • Earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project.


Download or complete this Application Form

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Den Chief Service

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

A boy scout that is serving as a den chief wears the Blue/Gold den chief braid. If serving as a Webelos den chief, he wears the Blue/Gold/Red braids. Once he has earned the Den Chief Service award, he can wear the Red/White/Blue den chief award braids. All braids are worn on the left shoulder, under the epaulet and under the arm.
den chief award


REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Serve the pack faithfully for 1 full year.
  2. Attend a den chief training (if available within year of service) OR be trained by the assistant Cubmaster and den leader.
  3. Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.
  4. Help Cub Scouts achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.
  5. Be the activities assistant in den meetings.
  6. Set a good example by attitude and uniforming.
  7. Be a friend to the boys in the den.
  8. Take part in weekly meetings.
  9. Assist the den at the monthly pack program.
  10. Meet as needed with the adult members of the den, pack, troop, team, or crew.
  11. Complete FOUR of these projects:
    1. Serve as a staff member of a Cub Scout special event, such as a Scouting show, bicycle rodeo, etc.
    2. Serve as a staff member of a Cub Scout Day camp or resident camp.
    3. Advance one rank.
    4. Assist in recruiting three new Cub Scouts.
    5. Assist three Webelos Scouts to join a troop.
    6. Help to plan and carry out a joint pack-troop activity.
    7. Recommend to your Scoutmaster, Varsity Scout Coach, or Venturing Advisor another Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer to be a den chief.

cub scout den chief
Den Chief
webelos den chief
Webelos Den Chief


There is no official form for this award, but you can use the Den Chief Service Record from the Den Chief Handbook or This Form might be useful.


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Eagle Palm

Intended for:Eagle Scouts
Details:
Eagle Palms are awarded for continued leadership and skills development (merit badges) after the Eagle Scout rank has been earned. These palms help keep the Eagle Scouts active within the unit, contributing to the leadership of the unit, and assisting with the growth of the other Scouts within the unit.

Eagle palms are pinned to the Eagle Award ribbon for Boy Scouts - they are not displayed on the uniform. Adult Eagle Scouts can display them on their ribbon or pinned to their Eagle Scout square knot patch.

After becoming an Eagle Scout, scouts may earn Palms by completing the following requirements:
  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least three months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after award of last Palm.
  2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Make a satisfactory effort to develop and demonstrate leadership ability.
  4. Earn five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or last Palm. Merit badges earned any time since becoming a Boy Scout may be used to meet this requirement.
  5. Take part in a Scoutmaster conference.
  6. Complete your board of review.

You may wear only the proper combination of Palms for the number of merit badges you earned beyond the rank of Eagle. The Bronze Palm represents five merit badges, the Gold Palm 10, and the Silver Palm 15.

Merit BadgesBronze PalmsGold PalmsSilver Palms
26one
31 one
36one
41oneone
46oneone
51two
56onetwo
61onetwo
66three
71onethree
76onethree
81four
86onefour
91onefour
96five
101onefive
106onefive
111six
116onesix
121onesix

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Emergency Preparedness

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

When a member has fulfilled the requirements, a completed application is submitted to the council. Upon approval, an Emergency Preparedness pin is awarded. The pin may be worn on civilian clothing or on the uniform, centered on the left pocket flap. The award may be earned more than once; for instance, as a young person advances through the ranks and is capable of more complex preparedness activities, but only one pin may be worn.




All emergency activities carried out by Scouting units must be appropriate for the ages and abilities of the young people involved. Units should participate only under the supervision of their own leaders, and plans for unit help must be coordinated with community agencies responsible for disaster preparedness.

Tiger Cub Requirements


  1. Complete Tiger Cub Achievement 3-Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe. This achievement covers a family fire plan and drill and what to do if separated from the family.

  2. Complete Tiger Cub Elective 27-Emergency! This elective helps a Tiger Cub be ready for emergencies and dangerous situations and has him discuss a family emergency plan with his family.

  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of these three activities.
    • Take the American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT) course.
    • Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
    • Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Wolf Cub Scout Requirements


  1. Complete Wolf Cub Scout Achievement 9*-Be Safe at Home and on the Street. This is a check of your home to keep it safe.
  2. Complete Wolf Cub Scout Elective 16*-Family Alert. This elective is about designing a plan for your home and family in case an emergency takes place.
  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
    • Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.
    • Join a Safe Kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.


Bear Cub Scout Requirements


  1. Complete Bear Cub Scout Achievement 11*-Be Ready. The focus of this achievement is the best way to handle emergencies.
  2. Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf Cub Scout:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more..
    • Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
    • Organize a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.


Webelos Scout Requirements

  1. Earn the Readyman activity badge from the community badge group.
  2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project. Here is a Emergency Kit Checklist to help.
  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf or Bear Cub Scout:
    • Take a first aid course conducted by your local American Red Cross chapter.
    • Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.
    • Organize a training program for your Webelos den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

Boy Scout and Varsity Scout Requirements

  1. Participate in creating an emergency plan for your home and for your troop or team's Scouting activities. Be sure you know thedetails of both emergency plans.
  2. Earn the First Aid or the Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
  3. With your troop or team, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training conducted by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Venturer Requirements

  1. Complete all of the Emergency Preparedness core requirement number 4 (page 17, Ranger Guidebook).
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Complete the First Aid core requirement (page 16, Ranger Guidebook This may be fulfilled either by completing the standard American Red Cross first aid course When Help Is Delayed or by completing the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Course.
    • With your crew, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training coordinated by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Unit Volunteer Scouter Requirements


This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members.

Do any three of the following:

  • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  • Participate actively in preparing an emergency plan of action for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Take a basic first aid/CPR course, or participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.

Council/District Volunteer Scouter Requirements


Do any three of the following:

  • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  • Take a basic first aid/CPR course.
  • Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for emergency disaster preparedness.
  • Participate actively in developing an emergency preparedness program for a council or district activity. Example: a camporee, Scouting show, fun day, etc.

Resources


  • http://www.ready.gov
  • Local chapter of the American Red Cross (emergency procedures and training)
  • Other local disaster relief agencies
  • Local law enforcement agencies (McGruff and other safe kids programs)
  • For youth requirements and electives, see the program book for that rank or part of the Scouting program.

Program Items


All Emergency Preparedness BSA items are available to local councils as Supply items, though the National Distribution Center.

  • Emergency Preparedness BSA pin, No. 00540 (civilian wear/uniform, centered on left pocket flap). Awarded when requirements are met. Only one pin may be worn.
  • Emergency Preparedness BSA information pocket card, No. 32185
  • Emergency Preparedness BSA support recognition certificate (8' x 10'), No. 32186





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Firem'n Chit

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:


This certification grants a Scout the right to carry matches and build campfires.

There is a wallet card and patch available.



To earn this certification, the Scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following:
  1. Read and understand fire use and safety rules from the Boy Scout Handbook.
  2. Secure necessary permits (regulations vary by locality).
  3. Clear all flammable vegetation at least 5 feet in all directions from fire (total 10 feet).
  4. Attend to fire at all times.
  5. Keep fire-fighting tools (water and/or shovel) readily available.
  6. Leave fire when it is cold out.
  7. Subscribe to the Outdoor Code and Leave-No-Trace.


The Scout's 'Firem'n Rights' can be taken from him if he fails in his responsibility.

(In our troop, we tear off a corner from the wallet card for any minor infraction. When all four corners are gone, the scout loses his fireman rights.)




There are two older versions of the card in circulation and still valid:


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Founder's Bar

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
In celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America, the New-Unit Task Force announces the Founder’s Bar recognition. This recognition is intended to emphasize the importance and pride of forming and nurturing a new Scouting unit.

The Founder’s Bar is worn by all youth and adults whose names are on a new-unit charter or who officially join the new unit before the unit recharters for the first time.

This recognition is not just for new units - original charter members of units created prior to 2010 can also wear this patch, as long as the unit is still in operation and the person is still a member.

Though the bar looks similar to an Interpreter's Strip, it is worn on the left sleeve below the unit numerals.
The patch, pocket certificate, and full-size certificate are available at local scout shops.

See BSA Details page.

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Good Turn for America

Intended for:All Scouts
Notes:This program was implemented in 2004 and ended in 2010.
Details:

Good Turn for America is a collaboration between the Boy Scouts of America and the Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity, American Red Cross, and thousands of other community organizations that focuses the power of volunteerism on important community issues. The three main issues addressed are: hunger, lack of adequate shelter, and poor health


Good Turn for America goals include the following:
  • Inspire youth and adult leaders in and out of Scouting to higher levels of service and volunteerism.
  • Provide additional program experiences to help youth members learn qualities of good citizenship and gain a sense of belonging to and being needed in their communities.
  • Build service collaborations with community organizations across every community in the country.
  • Affirm the BSA as the nation's leading collaborating organization in community service.
  • Heighten our nation's awareness of BSA's service commitment to all communities and citizens.


There are three major program areas.
  1. Scouting for Food Activities in Collaboration With The Salvation Army or Other Local Organizations. As unbelievable as it may seem, hunger remains a significant problem in the United States. In fact, one in five children in this country faces hunger. Hungry children, even those who experience only mild malnutrition during the critical stages of their development, may suffer irreparable harm.
    The BSA is concerned about hunger and helping community agencies provide food for the needy.
  2. Scouting for Shelter Activities in Collaboration With Habitat for Humanity or Other Local Organizations.
    The Urban Institute estimates that 3.5 million people in the United States, 1.35 million of them children, will experience homelessness during the course of a year. The need for simple, decent housing continues to grow in American communities.
    The BSA is concerned about shelter to the needy and improving the quality of life of those who must live in group homes or shelters.
  3. Scouting for Healthy Living Activities in Collaboration With the American Red Cross or Other Local Organizations.
    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It is a major risk factor for the number one cause of death: heart disease. Heart disease can be reduced by proper exercise and diet. Our children are being raised in an increasingly sedentary society, and obesity is a major health concern for youth. One out of five obese youth develops diabetes. Some researchers predict that today's children will be the first generation of Americans whose life expectancy will actually be shorter than that of their parents. The culprit, they say, is the health problems associated with obesity.
    The BSA is an organization that has always been concerned about the physical fitness and good health of Americans.

  4.  
     
    It takes a bit of work to ge through the 'paperwork' to receive the patches for this award. 
       
    • One designated person in each unit should contact a local council executive to get a unit-specific ID number. This ID allows the unit to access the www.goodturnforamerica.org web site and enter project hours.
    •  
    • Once project data is entered, the unit designee prints a certificate from the web site.
    •  
    • The certificate is presented to the local Scout Shop to allow the unit to purchase appropriate patches and segments.
    •  
    • The patches are presented to scouts at an appropriate ceremony.
    •  
     

    See GoodTurnForAmerica.org - (replaced by Journey to Excellence site)

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Heroism

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details:(Discontinued Dec. 2012)
The Heroism Award is presented to Scouts and Scouters that have saved or attempted to save a life at minimal personal risk.
This award may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life while registered in the Boy Scouts of America.

If it appears that the risk involved was merely in the performance of duty or the meeting of an obligation because of responsibility to supervise and give leadership to the person or people whose lives were saved, then recognition will not be given. The BSA National Court of Honor determines from evidence presented which lifesaving award, if any, shall be made. The court will give consideration to resourcefulness and demonstrated skills used in rescue methods.

Knot Description: Red on red knot on white background with white border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form.

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High Adventure Triple Crown

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The High Adventure Triple Crown award is available to scouts and scouters. There is no time limit on earning the award. Some participation requirements can be completed as a youth and the rest as an adult.

To receive the High Adventure Triple Crown award, you must complete any high adventure program at all three BSA national High Adventure bases - Philmont, Northern Tier, and Sea Base. These can be summer or winter programs. For example, either summer Canoeing or winter Okpik programs at Northern Tier qualify.


The basic rule is that if you receive a participant emblem/patch from the
High Adventure base during your program, it qualifies as your participation
requirement for that BSA high adventure base. Programs hosted by the
three bases and their satellites that do not qualify for earning a BSA high
adventure participant award do not qualify as meeting the Triple Crown
requirement. Examples include attending training such as Wood Badge or
similar programs are not qualified.

You will need to supply the program, crew number, dates, and staff member name for each of your three high adventure treks. A useful information page is online.

Use the Triple Crown Award application to get your award patch.

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Historic Trails

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
To earn the Historic Trails award, members of your unit must plan and participate in a historic activity.

See a list of Approved Historic Trails at the national BSA site.


A unit historic activity requires members to:
  1. Locate a historic trail or site and study information relating to it. (This information may be obtained from an adult historic society, public library, or from people living near the trail or the site.)
  2. Hike or camp 2 days and 1 night along the trail or in the vicinity of the site.
  3. Cooperate with an adult group such as a historic society to restore and mark all or part of this trail or site. (This may be done during the hike or overnight camp.) Or cooperate with such a group to plan and stage a historic pageant, ceremony, or other public event related to this trail or site : such event should be large enough to merit coverage by the local press.
  4. Your unit leader must then file the Historic Trails Award Application with your council service center.



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Hometown U.S.A.

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:The Hometown U.S.A. Award is a joint program between Keep America Beautiful Inc. (KAB) and the Boy Scouts of America. It is designed to give recognition to the outstanding efforts of Scouts in their communities in regard to citizenship and environmental improvement.
The Purposes of the Award:
  • To educate Boy Scouts about citizenship in relation to conservation and to involve them in community activities relating to environmental issues
  • To offer a mechanism by which Scouts can develop positive attitudes toward their environment and community while being exposed to interesting career opportunities
  • To provide the opportunity to honor Boy Scouts for their significant contributions toward keeping America beautiful


Award Requirements
  1. Merit badges. Earn three merit badges from the following list of twelve: Citizenship in the Community, Communications, Environmental Science, Fish and Wildlife Management, Forestry, Gardening, Geology, Landscape Architecture, Nature, Plant Science, Public Speaking, Soil and Water Conservation.
  2. Community service project. In addition to earning the merit badges, a Boy Scout is required to perform a community service project. The project should involve a minimum of eight hours of time, two of which must involve management planning, with the other six consisting of carrying out the project. It should help keep America beautiful and benefit the community either physically or financially. One way to do this is to plan the community service project as part of Keep America Beautiful Week or Public Lands Day.

Ideas for Community Service Projects
  1. Develop and help maintain a community garden.
  2. Build a nature trail for use as an outdoor classroom or for community enjoyment.
  3. Develop a recycling project that involves your whole troop (i.e., newspaper and/or bottle collection).
  4. Conduct a survey of local storefronts. Determine areas where litter has accumulated. Work with storeowners to help improve conditions.
  5. Plan and make a presentation to elementary students about the importance of conserving natural resources. Take students on a nature walk, pointing out natural resources.
  6. Conduct soil and water conservation activities on a heavily used trail to prevent erosion. Record your activities.

  7. Construct water facilities and plant vegetation that will provide food and shelter for wildlife in appropriate places.
  8. Adopt a park, block, vacant lot, etc. Erect signs urging others not to litter or vandalize. Protect a flower bed or plant species with fencing. Remove litter and debris. Build picnic tables or fix up old ones, paint benches, etc.
  9. Research which plant species are native to your area, and plant and maintain a community wildflower garden. Include descriptive and educational signs for the public.
  10. Organize an anti-litter poster competition among junior and senior high schoolers. Arrange for businesses to donate awards for the winners and recruit community judges. Include media coverage. Get local businesses and schools to display the posters.
  11. Become involved in a local environmental/recycling issue. Attend public meetings, talk to public officials, and make a report to your troop about what you have learned. Decide how you want to become involved in resolving the issue and spend your project time educating your fellow citizens as to your viewpoint and assisting your 'side' in its campaign.
  12. Establish and maintain a bird sanctuary.
  13. Find out which birds, animals, and fish are native to your area. Write an article on the importance of maintaining proper balance between man and nature. Take steps to maintain habitat areas for this wildlife.


Receiving the Patch

Scouts must complete the Hometown U.S.A. Award application form and present it to their Scoutmaster or troop advancement chairman.

In order to qualify for the award, Scouts must have successfully completed the requirements as outlined. The troop advancement chairman will know which merit badges each Scout needs in order to qualify.

It is suggested that the community service project be under the overall direction of a natural resources professional or other qualified adult supervisor. After completing the project, the adult supervisor should sign a statement that the project has been completed and meets the requirements of the project sponsor.



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Honor Medal

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The Honor Medal is presented to Scouts and Scouters who have shown courage in attempting to save a life with personal risk.
This award has been presented posthumously to Scouts who have died while attempting to save the life of another.
In very exceptional cases the award is presented with crossed gold palms to Scouts and Scouters who have attempted to save a life at great personal risk demonstrating exceptional heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness.

Knot Description: Red on green knot on tan background with yellow border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form. The National Court of Honor decides the merits of a submitted act and decides which, if any, recognition is awarded.

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International Activity

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:Discontinued in 2012 - see International Spirit Award

The International Activity Award is awarded to registered Youth and Adult Leaders involved in heightening awareness and cultural exchange with Scouts from other countries.

The patch is worn centered on the right pocket since it is a temporary emblem.



The specific requirements for earning this recognition are up to individual councils to define. BSA National has published some Suggested Criteria but you should check with your council for exact requirements.


Here are a few application forms available from various councils:

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International Spirit

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

The International Spirit Award is awarded to registered Youth and Adult Leaders that have broadened knowledge of international Scouting and increased appreciation and awareness of different cultures and countries.

The patch is worn centered on the right pocket since it is a temporary emblem.




Requirements:

Cub Scouts
  1. Earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award.
  2. Earn the Language and Culture Belt Loop.
  3. Participate in Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet.
  4. Complete two of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Boy Scouts/Varsity/Venturer
  1. Earn the Boy Scout or Venturing World Conservation Award.
  2. Earn the Citizenship in the World Merit Badge.
    (Alternative for Venturers: Complete the "Understanding Other Cultures" requirement of the TRUST Award.)
  3. Participate in Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet.
  4. Complete three of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Scouter
  1. Learn about the World Organization of the Scout Movement (scout.org). Explain what it is to your unit or at a district roundtable, and describe at least three ways the website can be used to help promote or increase participation in international Scouting.
  2. Check out the most current International Department newsletter (scouting.org/international/newsletter) and promote at least two items from the newsletter within your unit or at a district roundtable.
  3. Help organize or participate in two Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet events.
  4. Complete four of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Experience Requirements
  1. Host an international Scout or unit and plan activities to help you learn about Scouting in their country.
  2. Learn about another country and prepare a dinner traditionally served there. Explain what you learned to friends or family as you share the meal.
  3. Participate in a World Scout Jamboree, international camporee, or another international Scout event. Share the experience with your unit or at a district roundtable.
  4. Take a trip to another country as an individual, with your family, or Scout unit and include a visit with another Scout unit or event. When you return home, share the experience with another unit.
  5. Organize a World Friendship Fund collection at a unit meeting or district roundtable.*
  6. Earn the Interpreter Strip.
  7. Research Scouting in another country. Make a presentation at a unit meeting or district roundtable.
  8. Contact your local council's international representative and assist them with at least two items they need help with promoting.
  9. Research the process of obtaining a U.S. passport. Create a fact sheet for your unit or district to assist them with requirements for traveling internationally.
  10. Research a region of the World Organization of the Scout Movement. Make a presentation at a unit meeting or district roundtable.

Note: Experience Requirement #5 is mandatory.

See award application

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International Youth Exchange Emblem

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:Discontinued in 2012 - see International Spirit Award

For wear by scouts and scouters that have completed an international exchange program.

The patch is worn centered on the right pocket since it is a temporary emblem.

international youth exchange emblem


International Youth Exchange Emblem requirements:

  1. Participate for at least five days in a group exchange program, visiting a Scout group in another nation.* This visit can involve home hospitality, joint camping with the host group, or another joint activity.
  2. Participate for at least five days in a group exchange program, hosting a Scout group from another nation in
    your community.* This can involve home hospitality, joint camping with the guest group, or another joint activity.
  3. Plan activities, as both host and guest, that will provide both parties opportun-ities to learn about each other’s countries, cultures, and Scout associations.
  4. Exchange groups must be at least patrols or crews of six to eight Scouts or Venturers with two adult leaders.


The exchange group must complete all requirements to qualify for recognition.
Each individual in the group must complete all requirements to qualify. Certification of an individual for the International Youth Exchange emblem is the responsibility of the unit leader or a designated representative.
Unit representatives may order the emblems (No. ID-214) from the International Division at a cost of $4 per emblem. Please make check or money order payable to the Boy Scouts of America. Please provide documentation of exchange when ordering emblems.

( * Under special circumstances, the exchange can be with a non-Scout youth group from a nation without a recognized Scout program, if approved in advance by the International Division.)

The International Division
Boy Scouts of America
1325 West Walnut Hill Lane
P.O. Box 152079
Irving, TX 75015-2079
Telephone: 972-580-2401
Fax: 972-580-2413
E-mail: intnldiv@netbsa.org

Use Emblem order form to purchase patches.

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Interpreter Strip

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
Youth and adult members (Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers, and Sea Scouts, plus Scouters in all programs) may wear this strip if they show their knowledge of a foreign language or the sign language for the hearing impaired.


The interpreter strips are worn centered above the "Boy Scouts of America" strip on the uniform.

Earn the interpreter strip by:
  • Carrying on a 5-minute conversation in this language.
  • Translating a 2-minute speech or address.
  • Writing a letter in the language (Does not apply for sign language)
  • Translating 200 words or more from the written word.


Earn the Morse Code interpreter strip by:
  • Carrying on a five-minute conversation in Morse Code at a speed of at least five words per minute.
  • Copying correctly a two-minute message sent in Morse Code at a minimum of five words per minute. Copying means writing the message down as it is received.
  • Sending a 25-word written document in Morse Code at a minimum of five words per minute.


The requirements are verified by the unit leader, after receiving sufficient evidence of the Scout's or Scouter's ability to read, write, and speak the language. You can use this Interpreter Strip Confirmation form.
The unit leader should note the personal achievement on the local Council's Advancement Report for youth or Training Report for adults and submit to the Council. The unit leader purchases the strip from the local scout shop. If it is a rare language in your area, the strip may need to be ordered from a different council or National Supply Division.

Most Councils do not have a specific application form, but check with your scout shop or district executive to see.

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James E. West Fellowship

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: James E. West served as the first Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America for over 30 years.
The West Fellowship award is available for gifts of $1,000 or more to a council endowment fund. The gift must be in addition to - and not replace or diminish - the donor's annual Friends of Scouting support.
The James E. West Fellowship Award is an 8-by-10-inch certificate, personalized with the donor's name, date of gift, and council name.
In addition, there will be a distinctive lapel pin/charm and an embroidered square knot for uniform wear. While it is a national recognition, the James E. West Fellowship award is authorized and presented by the local council.
A registered BSA member of any age can receive this award.

Knot Description: Gold on green knot on tan background with red border.





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James M. Stewart Good Citizenship

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

The James M. Stewart Museum Foundation and The Boy Scouts of America offer an award for Boy Scouts, The James M. Stewart Good Citizenship Award. John Alline (Associate Director of the Boy Scouts of America) presented the first awards during the campfire at the Indiana County Bicentennial Boy Scout Camporee on Saturday, May 17, 2003. A four-inch full color embroidered patch featuring Brigadier General James Stewart was awarded to members of Troop 11 from Indiana, PA. A bronze medal is also available.

Jimmy Stewart Boy Scout Award

This award has been established by the James M. Stewart Museum Foundation with the consent and cooperation of the Boy Scouts of America, Penn's Woods Council and the family of James M. Stewart. The purpose of this award is to introduce Boy Scouts to the life of a great American, James Maitland Stewart. The Jimmy Stewart Museum is offering this award to a Boy Scout or Scouter who has exemplified the characteristics necessary to live the life of a Good Citizen. To earn the award, Scouts are required to complete the Jimmy Stewart Museum quiz, write an essay of not less than 500 words, and do a good citizenship project in their community in honor of James M. Stewart.

Interested Scouts or Scouters should contact The Jimmy Stewart Museum to receive a copy of the workbook. The price of the workbook is $6.00 which includes shipping. Scouts can send a check in that amount to:

The Jimmy Stewart Museum
P. O. Box 1
Indiana PA 15701

Once the required work has been done, the application form from the workbook, the quiz and the 500 word essay should be sent to the Museum. The patch and /or medal will then be sent. The price of the patch is $4.00, and the medal is $7.50. Please add $1.00 for each item ordered to cover shipping. Again, a check may be sent to the Museum.

Jimmy Stewart was born in Indiana, PA and grew up with a background in scouting. He remained involved with scouting throughout his adult life. It is hoped that the values of the Boy Scouts that were shared by Jimmy Stewart will become ingrained in each recipient of The James M. Stewart Good Citizenship Award.

Visit Jimmy.org

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Journey to Excellence

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

"Scouting’s Journey to Excellence" is the BSA’s council performance recognition program designed to encourage and reward success and measure the performance of units, districts, and councils. It replaces the Centennial Quality Awards program as a means of encouraging excellence in providing a quality program at all levels of the BSA.

Starting in January 2011, a new quality program called Journey to Excellence (JTE or sometimes J2E) has become the new national performance assessment, communication, and recognition program for units, as well as for councils and districts.

Many additional details are available on the BSA page.


The award patch is displayed on the uniform's right sleeve below the patrol emblem or den numeral. Only the most recent year's patch is worn, not a string of past year patches.

journey to excellence gold
journey to excellence silver
journey to excellence bronze

The Journey to Excellence program provides:

  • A framework for planning the year
  • A method for evaluating a unit
  • Guidance in areas where a unit might do better
  • Specific guidelines and standards of what is considered good performance
  • Early warning of potential problem areas
  • Recognition for good Scouting
  • Benchmarking to get ideas and tips from other good units


See BSA Info page for award details, forms, and FAQ pages.


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Kayaking BSA

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The BSA Kayaking Award Patch is not worn on the scout uniform. It is worn on the left side of the swim trunks.

Download the Kayaking Application Form and the Kayaking Information Page

Requirements
  1. Before fulfilling the following requirements, successfully complete the BSA Swimmer test.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Describe various types of kayaks and how they differ in design, materials, and purpose.
    2. Name the parts of the kayak you are using for this exercise.
    3. Demonstrate how to choose an appropriately sized kayak paddle and how to position your hands.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
    2. Demonstrate how to select and properly fit a PFD.
    3. Explain the importance of safety equipment such as PFDs, air bags, grab loops, and helmets.
  4. Demonstrate your ability to aid yourself and others in the event of a capsize:
    1. Capsize your kayak in water at least seven feet deep, perform a wet exit if necessary, and swim the boat to shore.
    2. With assistance, if needed, ready the capsized craft for use.
    3. Show how to approach a capsized paddler in your kayak and tow him to shore.
    4. While upright in your kayak, right a capsized kayak, empty it of water, and assist the paddler aboard without returning to shore.
  5. As a solo paddler, demonstrate the following:
    1. Entering and launching a kayak from shore or dock.
    2. Landing or docking and exiting a kayak.
    3. Forward stroke
    4. Sweep stroke
    5. Reverse sweep
    6. Draw stroke
    7. Rudder stroke
    8. Back stroke
  6. As a solo paddler, do the following:
    1. Paddle forward in a reasonably straight line.
    2. Move the kayak sideways to the right and to the left.
    3. Pivot 360 degrees to the right and left.
    4. Stop the kayak.



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Leave No Trace Boy Scout

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
Leave No Trace is a plan that helps people to be more concerned about their environment and to help them protect it for future generations. Leave No Trace applies in a backyard or local park (frontcountry) as much as it does in the wilderness (backcountry).

Leave No Trace is an awareness and an attitude rather than a set of rules. We should practice Leave No Trace in our attitude and actions wherever we go.

Leave No Trace Backcountry Guidelines
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors


Scout Award Requirements:
  1. Recite and explain in your own words the principles of Leave No Trace, and discuss how an ethical guideline differs from a rule.
  2. On three separate camping trips with your troop or team, demonstrate and practice the Leave No Trace skills appropriate to the trip.
  3. Earn the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project that reduces or rehabilitates recreational impacts. Discuss with your troop or team which recreational impacts were involved with the project.
  5. Give a 10-minute presentation on a Leave No Trace topic approved by your unit leader to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
  6. Teach a Leave No Trace-related skill to a Scouting unit or other interested group.


Adult Award Requirements:
  1. Recite and explain in your own words the principles of Leave No Trace, and discuss how an ethical guideline differs from a rule.
  2. On each of the three camping trips in Scout requirement 2, discuss with your troop or team the impact problems encountered and the methods the unit used to eliminate or at least minimize those impacts.
  3. Read chapters 7 through 10 (Leaving No Trace), chapter 27 (Understanding Nature), and chapter 34 (Being Good Stewards of Our Resources) in the BSA Fieldbook. Share with another adult leader what you learned.
  4. Actively assist (train, advise, and supervise) a Scout in planning, organizing, and leading a Leave No Trace service project that reduces or rehabilitates recreational impacts.
  5. Assist at least three Scouts in earning the Leave No Trace Achievement Award.
  6. Teach a Leave No Trace-related skill to a Scouting unit or other interested group.


The award patch is a 'temporary' patch and should be displayed centered on the right pocket, either sewn or hanging from the pocket button.

BSA Guidelines Page - for more details

Award Application Form

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Leave No Trace Cub Scout

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
Leave No Trace is a plan that helps people to be more concerned about their environment and to help them protect it for future generations. Leave No Trace applies in a backyard or local park (frontcountry) as much as it does in the wilderness (backcountry).

We should practice Leave No Trace in our attitude and actions wherever we go. Understanding nature strengthens our respect toward the environment.

When boys and leaders complete the requirements they may purchase a Cub Scout Leave No Trace temporary patch (No. 08797). Both the publication and patch are available through local councils. The patch should be displayed centered on the right pocket of the uniform.

Leave No Trace Frontcountry Guidelines
  1. Plan ahead
  2. Stick to trails
  3. Manage your pet
  4. Leave what you find
  5. Respect other visitors
  6. Trash your trash


Award Requirements:
  1. Discuss with your leader or parent/guardian the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  2. On three separate outings, practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
  3. Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, Let's Go Outdoors; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, Your Living World; boys in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, Family Outdoor Adventures; boys in a Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace - related service project.
  5. Promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
  6. Draw a poster to illustrate the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines and display it at a pack meeting.


Adult Award Requirements:
  1. Discuss with your den's Cub Scouts or your pack's leaders the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  2. On three separate outings demonstrate and practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
  3. Participate in presenting a den, pack, district, or council awareness session on Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project.
  5. Commit yourself to the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
  6. Assist at least three boys in earning Cub Scouting's Leave No Trace Awareness Award.


BSA Guidelines Page - for more details


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Medal of Merit

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The Merit Medal honors Scouts, Venturers and Scouters that have performed an act of meritorious service above and beyond what is normally expected of a youth or adult member of the Boy Scouts of America.

This act should demonstrate exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others.
The action does not necessarily need to involve rescue or saving life, but must demonstrate some aspect of Scouting ideals or skills.

You can read some stories of Real Scouts in Action for some examples.


Knot Description: Gold on Blue knot on tan background with tan border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form.

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Messengers of Peace

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Messengers of Peace is a global initiative aimed at encouraging youth to work toward peace. Taking advantage of social media, scouts from around the world share their efforts in order to inspire other scouts to undertake similar projects.
The World Scout Committee is promoting this program and it is administered by the World Scout Bureau.

Any Scout or Scouter who participates in a qualifying project can wear the Messengers of Peace ring patch. It is displayed around the World Crest above the left pocket of the uniform. Patches can be purchased by a unit representative at a local Scout Shop or council service center.

A qualifying project has a significant impact on the community in one of these three dimensions of peace:
  1. Personal dimension: harmony, justice, and equality
  2. Community dimension: peace as opposed to hostility or violent conflict
  3. Relationship between humankin and environment: security, social and economic welfare, and environment


Getting the Patch
Units that want to purchase patches should submit their Messengers of Peace related projects through the Journey to Excellence website and check the 'Messengers of Peace' box. This adds the project to the map on the Messengers of Peace website and generates a unit certificate which should be taken to the Scout Shop to purchase patches.

Some Project Ideas
  • Personal Dimension:
    • Holiday party for children of prison inmates
    • Book drive for inner-city school
    • Visit nursing home residents
    • Participate in Feed the Children, Feed My Starving Children, Toys 4 Tots, or other organization charitable efforts
  • Community Dimension:
    • Build a community prayer or meditation garden
    • Paint over graffiti with peace-related murals
    • Participate as 'victims' for CERT or EMT training courses
    • Host a day of games, sports, and activities that brings together kids from different segments of your community
  • Environmental Dimension:
    • Conduct a park, schoolground, campground, or river clean-up day
    • Remove invasive species
    • Clear brush from fire buffer zone
    • Perform shoreline or natural area restoration

    More ideas at JTE Tips.

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Mile Swim

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The BSA Mile Swim patch is to be worn on the left side of swim trunks. It is not to be worn on the scout uniform.

Requirements
  1. Explain how regular exercise contributes to good health and why swimming is one of the best forms of exercise.
  2. Tell what precautions and procedures a swimmer and escort must follow for distance swimming over open water.
  3. Under the supervision of a currently qualified certified aquatics instructor, BSA or equivalent, participate in 4 hours of training and preparation for distance swimming (1 hour a day maximum).
  4. Swim 1 mile over a measured course that has been approved by the trained instructor who will supervise the swim.


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National Camping

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:Discontinued - this award has been replaced by the National Outdoor Badges


The National Camping Award is both an annual and a cumulative award for units which receive a ribbon for the troop flag. Individuals, scouts, and scouters can also qualify for a cumulative patch by participating in campouts with their families, or patrols as well as unit campouts. Any combination of unit and individual campouts can be used to qualify for the individual cumulative award. Use the National Camping Award Form to record its campouts and apply for awards. An individual can use the National Camping Individual Award Form to record his campouts and apply for awards.

The patch is an individual award for which all members of a unit may not qualify. Only those members who have met the cumulative camp out levels may qualify for one of the four awards. Each individual member needs to keep track of his personal campouts and have them approved by the scoutmaster. The patch can be placed on a backpack or worn as a temporary badge on the uniform.

To earn the annual National Camping Award, a unit must have reached one of these levels of camping achievement:
  • 10 days and nights of camping - Unit Award Number 17831
  • 20 days and nights of camping - Unit Award Number 17832
  • 30 days and nights of camping - Unit Award Number 17833
  • 50 days and nights of camping - Unit Award Number 17834


To earn the cumulative National Camping Award, a unit must fulfill one of the following levels of camping during the entire history of the unit:
  • 100 days and night of camping - Unit award Number 17827
  • 250 days and night of camping - Unit award Number 17828
  • 500 days and night of camping - Unit award Number 17829
  • 1000 days and night of camping - Unit award Number 17830

The ribbon can also be displayed with the troop flag.


Individual scouts and scouters can also qualify for a National Camping Award patch provided that the required cumulative number of days and nights of camping has been met. This total can include any combination of camping with the scouts family, patrol or unit.
  • 100 days and nights of camping - Patch Number 00296
  • 250 days and nights of camping - Patch Number 00297
  • 500 days and nights of camping - Patch Number 00298
  • 1000 days and nights of camping - Patch Number 00299


Both the unit and individual cumulative awards are retroactive to January 1, 1991.

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National Den

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
The National Den Award recognizes dens that conduct a quality, year-round program. Service projects, Cub Scout Academics and Sports, field trips, character development, and Cub Scout camping are areas that are emphasized. Dens earn the award as a team, not as individual den members. The recognition is a ribbon for the den flag or den doodle.

national den award

To earn the National Den Award, a Cub Scout den must:
  • Have at least 50 percent of the den's Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, or Webelos Scouts attend two den meetings and one pack meeting or activity each month of the year.
  • Complete six of the following during the year:
    1. Use the denner system within the den.
    2. In a Tiger Cub den, use shared leadership and rotate the boy/adult host team.
    3. Have 50 percent of the den go on three field trips per year. A field trip may be used in place of a den meeting.
    4. As a den, attend a Cub Scout day camp, Cub Scout or Webelos Scout resident camp, or a council family camping event with at least 50 percent of the den membership.
    5. Conduct three den projects or activities leading to a Character Connections discussion.
    6. As a den, participate in at least one of the Cub Scout Sports programs.
    7. As a den, participate in at least one of the Cub Scout Academics programs.
    8. Have 50 percent of the den participate in a den conservation/resource project.
    9. Have 50 percent of the den participate in at least one den service project.

Once the requirements are completed as stated, the signed National Den Award application is sent to the local council service center where the ribbon can be obtained.

Download an application for the National Den Award.

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National Honor Patrol

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The very best patrols exhibit enthusiasm, teamwork, and camaraderie - that special spark known as patrol spirit.

The National Honor Patrol Award is given to patrols whose members make an extra effort to have the best patrol possible. Your patrol can earn the award by doing the following over a period of three months.

Your patrol may earn multiple award patches by meeting the requirements in additional 3 month time periods.


  • Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. Put the patrol design on equipment and use the patrol yell. Keep patrol records up-to-date.
  • Hold two patrol meetings each month.
  • Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting event.
  • Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders' council.
  • Help two patrol members advance in rank.
  • Have at least 75 percent of members in full uniform at troop activities.
  • Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders' council meetings.
  • Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in patrol membership.


Each unit leader determines if a patrol qualifies for the National Honor Patrol Award. The patch is an embroidered gold star (BSA No. 00367) worn around the patrol emblem and purchased at Scout shops or council service centers. There is no application form.

Patrol leaders may use this NHP award tracking sheet to record their efforts.

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National Outdoor Achievement

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The National Medal for Outdoor Achievement is the highest recognition that a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout can earn for exemplary achievement, experience, and skill in multiple areas of outdoor endeavor.

To earn this medal, the scout demonstrates proficiency in a wide array of skills and participates in a broad range of outdoor activities. The award is achieved by earning National Outdoor Badges and further expanding his skills and knowledge through training, leadership, and merit badges.

This award replaces the individual National Camping award.

In order for a Scout to earn the National Medal for Outdoor Achievement, the Scout must complete the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping with a silver device.
  3. Earn any two additional National Outdoor Badges, each with two gold devices.
  4. Earn the following merit badges: Backpacking, Emergency Preparedness, Nature, and Wilderness Survival.
  5. Complete a 16-hour course in Wilderness First Aid from the American Red Cross, Wilderness Medical Institute, or other recognized provider.
  6. Become a Leave No Trace Trainer by completing the 16-hour training course from a recognized Leave No Trace Master Educator.
  7. Plan and lead, with the approval of your unit leader, an outing for your troop, team, patrol, or squad in two of the following activity areas: hiking and backpacking, aquatic activities, or riding. Include in each outing a service element addressing recreational impacts resulting from that type of activity. With the approval of your unit leader, you may plan and lead the outings for another Cub Scout pack, Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, Sea Scout ship, or Venturing crew.
  8. Complete at least one of the following:
    1. Plan and lead, with the approval of your unit leader, an adventure activity identified in the National Outdoor Badge for Adventure for your troop, team, patrol, or squad.
    2. Successfully complete a season on a council summer camp staff in an outdoor area, such as aquatics, Scoutcraft, nature/environment, climbing, or COPE.


The unit leader completes the National Outdoor Achievement Award application and submits it to the local council service center.

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National Outdoor Badges

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The five National Outdoor Badges recognize a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout who demonstrates both knowledge and experience in camping, hiking, aquatics, riding, and adventure. Scouts earning the National Outdoor Badges have demonstrated that they are knowledgeable, safe, and comfortable in the outdoor activity covered by the badge.

When the first badge is earned, the scout receives the center patch and earned segment. Additional segments are added as the badges are earned.

The patch scheme is considered a temporary patch, so it can be displayed centered on the right pocket, or on a jacket, blanket, or other patch display.

These awards replace the individual National Camping award.

I've created these sheets to help scouts keep track of their nights, miles, hours, and activities: Camping, Hiking, Aquatics, Riding, Adventure.

National Outdoor Badges may be earned in the following areas:

Camping: A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping upon successfully completing the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Camping merit badge.
  3. Earn two of the following three merit badges: Cooking, First Aid, Pioneering.
  4. Complete 25 days and nights of camping - including six consecutive days (five nights) of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America - including nights camped as part of requirements 1 through 3 above.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 nights of camping. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 nights of camping. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of nights camping.

Hiking: A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Hiking upon successfully completing the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Hiking and Orienteering merit badges.
  3. Complete 100 miles of hiking or backpacking under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including miles hiked as part of requirement 2.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 50 miles hiked. A silver device is earned for each additional 200 miles of hiking. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of miles hiking.

Aquatics: A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Aquatics upon successfully completing the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Swimming and Lifesaving merit badges.
  3. Earn the Mile Swim BSA Award.
  4. Earn at least one of the following merit badges: Canoeing, Rowing, Small Boat Sailing, Whitewater. Complete at least 25 hours of on-the-water time, applying the skills that you learned in the merit badges.
  5. Complete at least 50 hours of any combination of swimming, canoeing, rowing, small-boat sailing, or whitewater activity under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including time spent in requirements 2 through 4.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 hours of aquatic activity. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 hours of aquatic activity. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of hours of aquatic activity.

Riding: A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Riding upon successfully completing the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Complete at least one of the following:
    1. Cycling merit badge and 100 miles of cycling; or
    2. Horsemanship merit badge and 50 miles of horseback riding.
  3. Complete 200 miles of riding activities, either on a non-motorized bike or a stock animal, under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including the miles in requirement 2.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 100 miles of riding. A silver device is earned for each additional 400 miles of riding. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of miles of riding.

Adventure: A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Adventure upon successfully completing the following requirements:
  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Complete either the Wilderness Survival or the Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
  3. Complete 10 of any combination or repetition of the following adventure activities under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America:
    1. A backpacking trip lasting three or more days and covering more than 20 miles without food resupply.
    2. A canoeing, rowing, or sailing trip lasting three or more days and covering more than 50 miles without food resupply.
    3. A whitewater trip lasting two or more days and covering more than 20 miles without food resupply.
    4. A climbing activity on open rock, following Climb On Safely principles, that includes camping overnight.
    5. Earn the National Historic Trails Award
    6. Earn the 50-Miler Award
    7. Attend any national high-adventure base or any nationally recognized local high-adventure or specialty-adventure program.

Items 3a-g may be repeated as desired. A single activity that satisfies multiple items in 3a-g may be counted as separate activities at the discretion of the unit leader. Similarly, a single activity that doubles an item in 3a-d may be counted as two activities at the discretion of the unit leader. A gold device may be earned for each additional five activities. A silver device is earned for each additional 20 activities. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of activities.

The unit leader completes the National Outdoor Badges application and submits it to the local council service center.

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National Outdoor Challenge Unit

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

The National Outdoor Challenge is a unit award that recognizes troops that maintain or increase the amount of outdoor activity when compared to the previous year.

The recognition is a streamer for the unit's flag.
(The actual streamer may be different than this image)

With the release of this award, the National Camping award has been discontinued.



To earn this award, the unit states on the application that it has:
  1. Developed an annual plan for the current year.
  2. Conducted 10 outdoor trips or activities with at least 50 percent of the registered youth participating OR increased the number of outdoor trips or activities compared to the previous year.
  3. Attended long-term resident camp or a local/national high-adventure experience of at least six days/five nights.
  4. Conducted at least one outing with a Webelos Scout den.
  5. Earned at least one outdoors-related* merit badge per Scout.
  6. Conducted at least one Leave No Trace program during the calendar year for a minimum of 50 percent of the members.


Note: Outdoors-related merit badges are: Backpacking, Camping, Canoeing, Climbing, Cooking, Cycling, Emergency Preparedness, Environmental Science, First Aid, Fish and Wildlife Management, Fishing, Fly-Fishing, Forestry, Hiking, Lifesaving, Orienteering, Pioneering, Rowing, Scuba, Snow Sports, Soil and Water Conservation, Swimming, Water Sports, Whitewater.

The unit leader completes the National Outdoor Challenge application and submits it to the local council camping committee.

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National Summertime Pack

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:summertime pack award pin A pack can qualify for the National Summertime Pack Award by planning and conducting three pack activities - one each in June, July, and August. This award can be an incentive for greater attendance at your summer pack activities.
Individual scouts that participate in all three pack events can receive the National Summertime Pack Award pin. Starting in 2008, there is a different color pin for each Cub Scout rank so earning the pin each year has more incentive.


national summertime pack award Qualifying packs receive a colorful streamer for their pack flag.

Dens with an average attendance of at least half their members at the three summer pack events will be eligible for a colorful den participation ribbon.

The purpose of the National Summertime Pack Award is to encourage packs to provide a year-round program by continuing to meet during the time periods when school is out of session for several weeks or months. If a pack is in a 'year-round school' (or is part of a home-school association), the pack could earn the Summertime Pack Award by having a special pack activity during those breaks.

A scout that earns the Summertime Pack Award pin should display it pinned on the right pocket flap. Multiple pins may be displayed from each year it is earned.
If the scout has also earned the Outdoor Activity Award, it should be sewn on the right pocket flap and then the Summertime pin pinned through the patch.

I've not been able to find 'official' info on the ranked Summertime Pack awards yet, but the local Scout Shop folks agreed with me on this interpretation...

Since the goal of the Summertime award is to have Packs continue the program through the summer, the summertime award scouts receive should match their current rank rather than the rank they are working on.
  • 1st grade - earn Tiger rank
  • summer - earn Tiger summertime pin
  • 2nd grade - earn Wolf rank
  • summer - earn Wolf summertime pin
  • 3rd grade - earn Bear rank
  • summer - earn Bear summertime pin
  • 4th grade - earn Webelos rank
  • summer - earn Webelos summertime pin
  • 5th grade - earn Arrow of Light, move on to Boy Scouts


Download the Application for the National Summertime Pack Award.


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NESA Scholarship

Intended for:Eagle Scouts
Details:The National Eagle Scout Association (NESA) is a fellowship of Eagle Scouts who use their efforts and influence toward forming the kind of young men America needs for leadership. The objective of NESA is 'to serve Eagle Scouts and, through them, the entire movement of Scouting.'
NESA offers a number of scholarships at national and regional levels.

NESA Scholarship Info

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OA Distinguished Service

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details: The Distinguished Service Award was created in 1940 to honor those who rendered service to the Order beyond the lodge level. The award is presented to those Arrowmen who have rendered distinguished and outstanding service to the Order on a sectional, regional, or national basis. Since the time of the first awards given in 1940, less than 750 Distinguished Service Awards have been presented.

The award is a sterling silver arrowhead, bearing an arrow pointing upward and to the wearer's right, suspended from a white neck-ribbon upon which are embroidered red arrows. Presentation of the award is limited; nominations are open to both youth and adults.

Knot Description: white on white knot on red background with red border.

Award Requirements: Download a Application Form.

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OA Leadership in Service

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
In recognition of the Order of the Arrow's heritage of service, the National Order of the Arrow Committee created a new three-year Leadership in Service Program which was announced at the 2004 NOAC. The Order strives to strengthen Scouting's foundation of service by further fostering in Arrowmen the ethic of servant leadership. By promoting and rewarding service that benefits the Boy Scouts of America's outdoor program, and the communities in which Scouts reside, the Order will be acting to support Scouting at the most important level.


Requirements:
Arrowmen must complete the following requirements each year in which they earn the award:
  • Give 8 hours of service participating in a lodge, chapter, or council service project benefiting a local council camp (lodge induction weekends do count). Service may be split over two or more events.*
  • Give 6 hours of service doing a community service project planned and run by the lodge or chapter.**

  • *Working as camp staff does not fulfill the council service requirement.
    **Lodges are encouraged to use the OA's Lodge Community Service Guide to aid them in planning community service projects.

The timeline for the Leadership in Service Award is a graduated system that encourages Arrowmen to continue their service from year to year. Requirements for the award can be met during the calendar years of 2005, 2006, and 2007. Service from a previous year cannot be carried over to meet the next year's requirements. Arrowmen of all ages may earn the First Year award in 2005, 2006 or 2007, the Second Year in 2006 or 2007, and the Third Year Award in 2007 only.

Signatures for the requirements of this award may be signed off by the Arrowman's Scoutmaster, Lodge Chief and Lodge Advisers. Arrowmen should contact their lodge to obtain sign-off forms. Completed forms should be returned to the lodge. The awards will be presented by the lodge at an appropriate occasion.

A Leadership In Service Award Sign-Off Form is available for Arrowmen to use to report the completion of this award to their lodge.

Ordering the Award
Lodges will receive an order form in their Lodge Program Support Pak after they recharter.
The award for first time receipients (ribbon) costs $5.00. The awards for second and third time recipients (silver and bronze feathers) cost $2.00.

Completed order forms should be mailed to:
Order of the Arrow
Boy Scouts of America
P.O. Box 152079
Irving, TX 75015-2079

Lodges have until March 1 of the next year to submit their award orders.

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Order of Arrow Triple Crown

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
A special limited-edition patch is now available for Order of the Arrow members who attend the OA Wilderness Voyage at Northern Tier in Ely, Minnesota, the OA Trail Crew at Philmont Scout Ranch in Cimmaron, New Mexico and the OA Ocean Adventure at the Florida Sea Base in Islamorada, Florida.

Read more about these great, less expensive high adventures on the OA High Adventure site.

You will need to provide your Trek Number and Year on the OA Triple Crown Award application


The OA treks at Philmont, Northern Tier, and Sea Base are a great opportunity for Arrowmen to experience the high adventure bases for a reduced price on a special program not available to all scouts. Part of the time is spent performing service for the base and the rest is an adventure trip.

I was fortunate to spend 4 days with two young Arrowmen at Northern Tier in September of 2006 while I was on a short training trek there to earn my Leave No Trace Master Educator authorization. They showed me some of the portage work that the OA crews had accomplished and it was impressive. At Philmont, OA crews do trail maintenance. At Sea Base, they do oceanographic work. It isn't your run-of-the-mill service projects - the crew members learn useful skills and accomplish a lot.

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Pack Competition

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
There are three Pack competitions that are commonly held as annual events. Medals can be presented to all participants and blue, red, and white medals present to first, second, and third place. The competitions are:
  • Pinewood Derby - gravity powered wooden cars racing down a standard track.
  • Raingutter Regatta - scout breath-powered sailboats racing in a water-filled raingutter.
  • Space Derby - rubber-band propellor powered rockets racing on a stretched string.

These medals can be displayed pinned above the left pocket or on a red vest. Up to five medals can be displayed on the uniform shirt.

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Paddleboarding

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

The BSA Stand Up Paddleboarding patch is a temporary patch, to be displayed centered on the right pocket of the uniform shirt.

Download the Info and Application Form

Requirements:
  1. Review the BSA Safety Afloat policy. Explain to your instructor how this applies to stand up paddleboarding.
  2. Before fulfilling other requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feet first into water over the head in depth, level off, and begin swimming. Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and must include one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
  3. Explain safety considerations for stand up paddleboarding in the following environments: lake, moving water, whitewater, open ocean, ocean surf.
  4. Review the characteristics of life jackets most appropriate for stand up paddleboarding and understand why one must always be worn while paddling. Then demonstrate how to select and fit a life jacket for stand up paddleboarding.
  5. Describe the correct type of leash to wear in the appropriate water venues.
  6. Name and point out the following:
    1. The major parts of a stand up paddleboard
    2. The parts of a paddle for stand up paddleboarding
  7. Discuss:
    1. The different types of stand up paddleboards
    2. How to correctly size and hold a paddle for stand up paddleboarding
  8. Using a properly outfitted stand up paddleboard, demonstrate the following:
      How to safely carry a stand up paddleboard
    1. How to safely paddle away from a dock or shoreline (on knees)
    2. How to stand and balance on a board in the neutral position
    3. How to appropriately fall off a board
    4. How to remount the board
    5. Forward stroke
    6. Back stroke
    7. Forward sweep
    8. Reverse sweep
    9. Draw stroke
    10. One self-rescue technique—lay on your stomach and paddle with your hands
  9. With supervision from your instructor, paddle a course that involves:
    1. A straight line for 25 yards and stop within one board length
    2. A figure 8
    3. Moving abeam to the right 10 feet and to the left 10 feet

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Participation

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Packs and Troops will often have their own competitions between dens or patrols, or individual scouts. Districts may have competitions at camporees or other scouting events.
The BSA has official participation medals for use in any scouting activity. There are gold, silver, and bronze medals with a blue/gold ribbon for Cub Scouts or red/white ribbon for Boy Scouts.

These medals can be displayed pinned above the left pocket or on a red vest or scout blanket. Up to five medals can be displayed on the uniform shirt.

There are other styles of participation and placement ribbons available at your scout shop besides these medals.

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Paul Bunyan Woodsman

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:


A scout that has earned his Totin' Chip can demonstrate advanced woodsman skills by teaching Totin' Chip skills to other scouts and completing a woodsman work project.

There is a wallet card and patch for backpack or blanket available.




To earn this certification, study the Boy Scout Handbook and the Camping merit badge pamphlet, and demonstrate to your Scoutmaster or other qualified person the following:
  1. Show that you have earned the Totin' Chip.
  2. Help a Scout or patrol earn the Totin' Chip and demonstrate to him (them) the value of proper woods-tools use on a troop camping trip.
  3. With official approval and supervision do ONE of the following:
    1. Clear trails or fire lanes for 2 hours.
    2. Trim a downed tree, cut into 4-foot lengths and stack; make a brush pile with branches.
    3. Build a natural retaining wall or irrigation way to aid in a planned conservation effort.





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Physical Fitness

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
The award's objectives, developed by the Council Services Division of the National Council and the national BSA Health and Safety Committee, are as follows:
  • Encourage youth fitness in the BSA by providing positive role models and by enhancing youth awareness and understanding of fitness parameters, health risks, and personal circumstances.
  • Encourage physical fitness among Scouters by enhancing their awareness and understanding of fitness parameters, health risks, and personal circumstances.
  • Reduce the rate of stress- and fitness-related incidents throughout Scouting.


The award application form is no longer available at its old scouting.org location. The patch is still available on ScoutStuff.org as of 4/13/2014.

People who earn the recognition can receive a special certificate and can purchase and wear the unique BSA Physical Fitness Award patch. In addition, upon completion of the Fitness Award requirements, Scouts and Scouters may wear a special recognition pin and patch that can be purchased through their local council.

This award is a national program of emphasis designed to heighten fitness awareness and to help change the lifestyles of American youth and adults regarding exercise and a healthy diet to improve the quality of their lives.

This award has been developed to:
  • Encourage the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills that promote fitness and safe conduct.
  • Lay a skill, knowledge, and attitude foundation of the seven major components of fitness.
  • Improve health, fitness, and quality of life through daily physical activity.




The BSA Physical Fitness Award's core requirements are the following seven major components. They are used to measure an individual's improvement over time, not to establish an arbitrary minimum level of activity.

Posture: Posture is evaluated with a posture-rating chart. The Scout or Scouter is compared to a photo of his or her starting posture, noting 13 different body segments. Each body segment is scored as a five, three, or one, making a possible range of scores from 13 to 65. Higher scores over time reflect improving posture.
Accuracy: The target throw is used to measure accuracy. The Scout or Scouter makes 20 throws with a softball at a circular target and is scored on the number of times the target is hit.
Strength: The sit-up is used to measure strength. The Scout or Scouter lies on his or her back with knees bent and feet on the floor. The arms are crossed on the chest with the hands on the opposite shoulders. The feet are held by a partner to keep them on the floor. Curl to the sitting position until the elbows touch the thighs. Arms must remain on the chest and chin tucked on the chest. Return to the starting position, shoulder blades touching the floor. The score is the number of sit-ups made in a given time.
Agility: The side step is used to measure agility. Starting from a center line, the Scout or Scouter sidesteps alternately left and right between two lines 8 feet apart. He or she is scored on the number of lines crossed in 10 seconds.
Speed: The dash is used to measure speed. The score is the amount of time to the nearest half-second running a set distance that can be increased each year.
Balance: The squat stand is used to measure balance. The Scout or Scouter squats with hands on the floor and elbows against the inner knee. He or she leans forward until the feet are raised off the floor. The score is the number of seconds held in that position.
Endurance: The squat thrust is used to measure endurance. The Scout or Scouter starts from the standing position. He or she performs the usual four-position exercise. The score is the number of completed squat thrusts made in a given time.

Some of these tests measure more than the components they represent. For example, the sit-ups, a measure of strength, also reflect some endurance because of their repetition. The squat stand requires balance, its major component, but also requires strength and endurance to support the weight of the body on the arms.


Requirements:
  1. Complete a cardiovascular fitness evaluation/consultation with your personal health care provider. (This can be done as part of the examination required by any council-approved class 3 medical evaluation.)
  2. Using the BSA references listed after the seven major components, give a presentation to a BSA or other community youth group (at least eight youth participants) on cardiovascular fitness, diet, the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise, exercise recommendations for the Scout-age group, and healthy lifestyles.
  3. Review the BSA guidelines for the Athletics and other physical activity or personal fitness-oriented merit badge and explain steps you have taken to follow each of the guidelines for the fitness goals. Explain precautions to be taken for a physical fitness activity in each of the following: woods, fields, facilities, and waterfront.
  4. Explain to your mentor the symptoms of dehydration and hypothermia. Explain the special considerations for preventing dehydration and hypothermia.
  5. Properly outfit for physical activities with proper equipment, clothing, and footwear. Know your own capabilities and limitations. Illustrate how you would prepare for the physical fitness goals included in the award program.
  6. With supervision from your mentor or other qualified persons, set up a fitness goal-oriented plan using the seven major components of fitness.
  7. Demonstrate your ability to improve your strength, posture, endurance, agility, speed, accuracy, and balance with your own goal-oriented fitness plan.



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Ready And Prepared

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The BSA Ready and Prepared Award was developed to encourage and reward Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews that incorporate safe practices while enjoying challenging activities. The award acknowledges the common sense and judgment, founded on knowledge and training, used to incorporate risk management into a unit's decision-making process.

It recognizes that the more responsibility individual members take for their personal health and safety, the more everyone contributes to a successful activity. Earning the award helps units focus on areas in which emphasizing risk management can help reduce fatalities and serious injury, such as
  • Driver and passenger safety
  • BSA Youth Protection
  • Precautions for aquatics activities
  • Premises safety and first-aid readiness
  • Personal fitness and safety


The Award
There are two award levels: Gold and Silver.

To earn the Gold Award, a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew must complete 10 mandatory requirements and 3 elective requirements. Youth and adult members of a unit earning the Gold Award are entitled to wear the gold-bordered BSA Ready & Prepared Award patch and the unit is entitled to display the gold BSA Ready & Prepared ribbon.

To earn the Silver Award, a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew must complete 10 mandatory requirements and 6 elective requirements. Youth and adult members of a unit earning the Silver Award are entitled to wear the silver-bordered BSA Ready & Prepared Award patch, and the unit is entitled to display the silver BSA Ready & Prepared Award ribbon. Units earning the Silver Award also will be acknowledged in Boys' Life magazine. Apply for this award at the time of rechartering.

Award Requirements

All instruction for and participation in activities for the BSA Ready and Prepared Award must follow all precautions and safety measures laid out in the Guide to Safe Scouting and other Scouting literature.

When a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew has fulfilled the requirements, it should submit a completed award application to the local council.

A unit can earn the Gold Award this year, work on the remaining three elective requirements, and earn the Silver Award next year.


Mandatory Requirements

Training
  1. At least three registered adults in the unit are trained in Safety Afloat and Safe Swim Defense.
  2. Two or more registered members, including at least one adult, are trained in first aid and CPR by a recognized agency such as the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association. (See CPR Training and Certification web site)

Youth Protection
  1. Every registered adult in the unit was trained in BSA Youth Protection within the past three years.
  2. Within the past 12 months the unit has viewed the appropriate Youth Protection video.
    • 'A Time to Tell' (ages 11 to 14)
    • 'Personal Safety Awareness' (ages 14 to 20)
  3. All registered adults and all adults listed as drivers on tour permits for activities occurring during the past six months have read and signed the Driver's Pledge.
  4. The Scoutmaster, Coach, or Advisor; assistant Scoutmasters, Coaches, or Advisors; and unit committee chair have in their possession and have read the most current Guide to Safe Scouting.

Premises Safety
  1. Unit members have conducted a safety check of their meeting place using the checklist in the Guide to Safe Scouting.

  2. The unit first-aid kit was updated in the past six months and is complete.

Permits
  1. During the past 12 months the unit filed all required tour permits with the local council. A national tour permit is required for all activities in which travel is 500 or more miles one-way. Local councils set requirements for travel fewer than 500 miles one-way.

Driving/Traffic Safety
Troops and Teams Only
  1. At least half of the Scouts registered in the unit have earned the Traffic Safety merit badge.

Venturing Crews Only
  1. All youth with a driving permit or driver's license have taken Venturing Out: Keys to Safe Driving online or have attended a group presentation.


Elective Award Requirements
In addition to the mandatory requirements, units must complete 3 of these elective requirements to earn the Gold Award or 6 to earn the Silver Award.

Youth Training
Troops and Teams Only
  1. At least half of the registered Scouts have earned the First Aid merit badge.

Venturing Crews Only
  1. At least half of the registered crew members are trained in CPR by a recognized agency such as the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

Fitness
  1. At least 75 percent of unit members have completed requirements for the To Be Physically Fit BSA Award or the Quest Award.

Permits
  1. The unit has filed a Unit Money Earning Application with the local council for all unit fund-raising activities occurring in the past 12 months.

Special Achievements
  1. The unit has earned the Emergency Preparedness Award.
  2. Unit members have conducted a safety promotion within their community. Areas of interest include Climb On Safely, winter sports, bicycle safety, shooting sports, using tools and equipment, wilderness camping, and using fuels.
  3. Each member of the unit has read chapter 6, Managing Risk, in the Fieldbook and has participated in a group discussion about what he or she read.
  4. The unit has a risk management or health and safety officer. This position can be youth or adult. Attach a copy of the responsibilities of this position to the award application.


Down load the Ready and Prepared Award Application.


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Recruiter Strip

Intended for:Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts
Details:

Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts may earn the Recruiter Strip by recruiting other boys to join scouts.

The strip is worn centered directly below the right pocket on the uniform.

There are no formal requirements for these strips. Each Council establishes the procedure for awarding the strip, so please check with your local council office or unit leader.

Usually, a Recruiter Strip is awarded to a Cub Scout or Boy Scout the first time he recruits a friend, relative, classmate, or other acquaintance to join his unit.

Normally, one strip can be awarded to a boy while a Cub Scout and another while he is a Boy Scout if he recruits at both levels.

boy scout recruiter patchThe national BSA and local Councils tend to have special recruiting drives for which collector recruiter patches are made available. For example, in 2007, the Centennial Recruiter program has been going on at the national level with this patch available to scouts that recruit another boy to join. This patch in addition to the recruiter strip is awarded since these kinds of patches are considered temporary patches.



Here are a couple more recruiter patches that have been available to scouts...


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Religious Emblem

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
To encourage members to grow stronger in their faith, religious groups have developed religious emblems programs. The Boy Scouts of America has approved of these programs and allows the emblems to be worn on the official uniform. The various religious groups administer the programs.
Once earned, the award is generally presented by the church or religious group but may also be recognized by the Scout unit at an event such as a Court of Honor or Troop meeting or Pack meeting. This award may be earned as a youth, or presented to an adult that is nominated.
For each faith, a specific set of requirements is published and is established by the religious faith and not by BSA. For a listing of resources for each of the religious faiths that participate in this program, see the P.R.A.Y. web site

Check with your local council service center or contact the religious organization directly to obtain the curriculum booklets.


See BSA Page for more info.

Knot Description: silver on silver knot on purple background with purple border.
Once earned as a youth, the knot may be displayed on the uniform from that time forward. If a Scout earns the youth award and as an adult later is presented the adult award as well, both knots may be worn.

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SCUBA BSA

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The SCUBA BSA Award Patch is not worn on the scout uniform. It is worn on the left side of the swim trunks.

Download the SCUBA BSA Application Form

Requirements
  1. Before doing other requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. To begin the test, jump feet first into water over the head in depth, level off, and begin swimming. Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and must include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
  2. Discuss the importance of using the buddy system at all times while scuba diving. Explain that a dive buddy is there to assist with the donning and doffing of equipment, to lend assistance in case of emergency and to share in the underwater experience. Remember, always dive with a buddy - Never dive alone!
  3. Review hazards associated with scuba diving, including causes of decompression incidents, and safety procedures to avoid them. Explain the importance of never using scuba equipment unless you are enrolled in a training exercise, or have completed a diver certification program, taught by a certified instructor. By the end of a Water Skills Development session, the participants will be able to meet the following requirements in clear, confined water:
  4. State the purpose of the following pieces of basic diving equipment: mask, fins, BCD, BCD inflator, regulator, air gauge and alternate air source.
  5. Describe how to locate the air gauge, and explain how to recognize the "caution zone" on it.
  6. Don and adjust mask, fins, snorkel, BCD, scuba, and weights with the assistance of a buddy, instructor, or certified assistant.
  7. While underwater, demonstrate and recognize the following hand signals:
    • Okay?/Okay!;
    • Stop; Up;
    • Down;
    • Out of air;
    • Come here;
    • Ear problem;
    • Slow down/Take it easy;
    • Something is wrong;
    • Watch me;
    • Check your air supply.
  8. Inflate/deflate a BCD at the surface using the low pressure inflator.
  9. In shallow water, demonstrate proper compressed air breathing habits; remembering to breathe naturally and not hold the breath.
  10. Clear the regulator while underwater using both exhalation and purge-button methods and resume normal breathing from it.
  11. In shallow water, recover a regulator hose from behind the shoulder while underwater.
  12. In shallow water, clear a partially flooded mask while underwater.
  13. Swim underwater with scuba equipment while maintaining control of both direction and depth, properly equalizing the ears and mask to accommodate depth changes.
  14. While underwater, locate and read submersible pressure gauge and signal whether the air supply is adequate or low based on the gauge's caution zone.
  15. In shallow water, breathe underwater for at least 30 seconds from an alternate air source supplied by the instructor.
  16. Demonstrate the techniques for a proper ascent.

*The counselor for Scuba BSA must hold an instructor rating and be in current teaching status with PADI, NAUI, SSI or other member of the RSTC in accordance with BSA scuba policies. Instruction must meet the minimum training standards for introductory scuba experiences set by the RSTC and guidelines provided in the Scuba BSA Brochure, No. 13-971. BSA scuba policies are provided in that brochure and also in the Guide to Safe Scouting.


Information For Counselors

Counselors for Scuba BSA must hold current scuba instructor certification from PADI, NAUI, SSI, or other RSTC member organizations. Instruction must comply with RSTC standards for introductory scuba experiences. These minimum standards include instructor to participant ratios. In a pool, the ratio is eight participants per instructor. In a confined waterfront setting the ratio is four participants per instructor. Ratios may be increased by two participants if the instructor is assisted by someone certified as a dive master or assistant instructor.

A second adult who understands the procedures should be present in case the instructor becomes incapacitated. Two-deep adult leadership is also required by BSA youth protection guidelines.

Before participants are allowed in the water, they must complete a health history form designed for scuba activities. Instructors should use standard forms advocated by their certifying agency.

Skill instruction must be conducted in clear, confined water. A swimming pool is recommended. Scuba BSA is ideally suited to winter programs using indoor pools. Two 45-minute sessions are recommended for instruction, practice, and completion of requirements.

Although Scuba BSA is similar to introductory scuba experiences offered by various RSTC member organizations, those programs are not substitutes for Scuba BSA. All requirements must be completed as stated on the application form. The counselor may not omit, vary, or add requirements. In particular, Scuba BSA has a prerequisite swimming requirement, is only available to youth and adults registered in the Boy Scouting or Venturing programs, and does not include the option of an open-water dive.

Local council programs may not compress or sell air for scuba use, or sell, rent, or loan scuba equipment. All air and equipment for local council Scuba BSA programs must be obtained from properly licensed sources, unaffiliated with the Boy Scouts of America and under the supervision of PADI, NAUI, SSI, or other RSTC-approved and certified scuba instructors.

Individuals completing the Scuba BSA requirements qualify for a recognition card and patch. The counselor or unit leader should submit the completed award application to the local council service center.




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Snorkeling

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The BSA Snorkeling Award Patch is not worn on the scout uniform. It is worn on the left side of the swim trunks.

Download the Snorkeling Application Form

Requirements
  1. Pass Swimmer test. Before doing other requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feetfirst into water over the head in depth, swim 75 yards/meters in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards/meters using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards/meters must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
  2. Explain buddy system. Discuss the importance of the buddy system in all aquatics activities, and explain specifically how the buddy system is to be used at all times, beginning with the fitting and adjusting of equipment.
  3. Define snorkeling. Define snorkel swimming and diving; explain the function, fit, and selection of mask, fins, and snorkel. How is a safety vest used in snorkeling, and when must it be worn?
    Demonstrate use of mask and snorkel. In confined, shallow (waist-deep) water, demonstrate the use of the following:
    1. Defogging mask; equalizing pressure in mask, ears, and sinus cavities.
    2. Snorkel, including the clearing of water at surface and resuming free breathing without removing snorkel from mouth.
  4. Demonstrate use of swim fins. In confined, shallow (waist-deep) water, demonstrate use of swim fins: (NOTE: Requirements should first be completed using only fins, and then repeated while wearing mask and snorkel.)
    1. Fit and adjust fins to feet.
    2. Swim at the surface (10 meters) and underwater (3 meters) using the flutter kick.
    3. Control direction without using hands while swimming with fins at the surface and underwater.
  5. Perform deepwater demonstrations. In confined, deep water (maximum 12 feet), demonstrate:
    1. Proper techniques for entering and exiting the water while wearing snorkeling equipment.
    2. Headfirst and feetfirst surface dives, including proper body position for safe ascent and descent.
  6. Recover objects. Using mask, fins, and snorkel, you and a buddy swim in a confined area of clear water 8-12 feet deep that has a firm bottom:
    1. Locate and recover from the bottom an object weighing approximately 10 pounds.
    2. Locate and recover from the bottom an object approximately the size of an automobile ignition key.
  7. Explain snorkeling preparation and precautions. Explain what special preparation, training, and precautions are required for open-water diving; include survival skills. Understand and explain ascent and descent hazards of diving. Demonstrate knowledge of the diving environment in which you are to learn and practice. Explain the environmental factors that affect snorkeling. Discuss the special precautions for each of the following aquatic environments: ocean, stream, lake.
  8. Discuss submerged-related factors. Explain pressure, buoyancy, and submerged optics and acoustics related to snorkel swimming and diving.
  9. Discuss submersion effects; CPR. Discuss the effects of submersion in water on the body and how to handle potentially dangerous situations. What is cardiopulmonary resuscitation and under what circumstances should it be used?
  10. Explain hyperventilation. Understand and explain hyperventilation.
  11. Explain hypothermia. Understand and explain hypothermia.
  12. Demonstrate diver's signs and signals. Explain and demonstrate divers' signs and signals, both audible and visual, for use at the surface and under water. Set out a divers' flag and explain its function. Explain the use of equipment markings.



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Spirit of the Eagle

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:The untimely death of a promising, exemplary young person represents a tragic, sorrowful occurrence for any family and community. For that reason the Boy Scouts of America created the Spirit of the Eagle Award. This award is an honorary, posthumous recognition for a registered BSA youth member who has lost his or her life in an accident or through illness. Bestowed by the National Court of Honor as part of the celebration of the young person's life, the award recognizes the joy, happiness, and life-fulfilling experience Scouting made in that life, while also helping to heal and comfort the youth member's family, loved ones, and friends with the loss.

Award guidelines:
  • recipient must be a registered youth member under 21 years of age at the time of his or her death
  • unit committee must submit an application for the award within six months of the youth member's death
  • unit committee must request the approval of the local council


Applications (BSA No. 92-108) are available through local council service centers or HERE.

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Super Achiever

Intended for:Webelos Scouts
Details:
The Super Achiever award is for Webelos scouts that earn all 20 activity pins before their Arrow of Light ceremony. This award is a council-specific award, not an official advancement award. Check with your pack leader or council to see if you can use it.


The award can be ordered from:

Minneapolis Scout Shop (Northern Star Council Office)
5300 Glenwood Avenue
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55422
Phone: (763) 545-9459
 
Or, from other councils or the national scout shop.

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Tech Chip

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

This is NOT an official BSA award. It was created by Troop 479 in Eden Prairie, MN. The troop has designed a training outline and has wallet cards for purchase - see Tech Chip Training Plan for details.

Some scout units ban electronic devices, such as cellphones, iPods, games, and radios, creating a situation in which adults become policemen, enforcing rules rather than training scouts. These same 'policemen' usually exempt themselves from the ban, causing an unfair environment. Some even confiscate devices, putting themselves at a financial risk for that device.

Scouting evolves as technology becomes available. Compasses, watches, GPS, LED lights, and other outdoor gear has improved over the years and scouts have taken advantage of those improvements. As technology continues to evolve and become more and more embedded in every part of our lives, scout leaders need to continue to make use of it. By teaching courteous use, scouts and adults can take advantage of technology to create a safer outdoors experience without reducing the value of the experience for others.


This training and certification grants a scout the privilege to carry and use electronic devices at scout activities. Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Venturers can use the same training and cards.

There is no patch available at this time.

To earn this certification, the scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following:
  1. Recite and agree to proper use of electronic devices:
    1. Use only earlier than defined "Lights Out" time.
    2. Use when it does not interfere with other activities.
    3. Use when it does not affect others experience, or my safety.
  2. Assume all liability for the devices I bring.
  3. Demonstrate placing my device in silent mode.



The Scout's "Tech Privileges" can be lost if he fails in his responsibility.

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Totin' Chip

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:


This certification grants a Scout the right to carry (totin'!) and use woods tools.

This is a very important wallet card to have onhand at all times when camping.

There is a wallet card and patch available.



To earn this certification, the Scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following:
  1. Read and understand woods tools use and safety rules from the Boy Scout Handbook.
  2. Demonstrate proper handling, care, and use of the pocket knife, ax, and saw.
  3. Use the knife, ax, and saw as tools, not playthings.
  4. Respect all safety rules to protect others.
  5. Respect property. Cut living and dead trees only with permission and with good reason.
  6. Subscribe to the Outdoor Code.


The Scout's 'Totin' Rights' can be taken from him if he fails in his responsibility.

(In our troop, we tear off a corner from the wallet card for any minor infraction. When all four corners are gone, the scout loses his totin' rights.)

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Trained Strip

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:

Scouts and adults may earn the Trained Strip by completing required training for their position.

The strip is worn centered directly below and touching the emblem of leadership for which it was earned on the left sleeve of the uniform.


Youth in leadership positions earn the Trained Strip by attending the three modules included in the Troop Leadership Training course.
The modules are basically:

  • What a leader must know
  • What a leader must be
  • What a leader mus do

When a scout leaves the specific position for which he attended training, he should remove the Trained Strip. When he assumes a new leadership role and attends training for that role, he can again where the patch.


The following lists the minimum training required for adults to earn the Trained Strip. There are other valuable training programs, such as Wood Badge, available to adults so please take advantage of them to improve the program you offer the scouts:

  • Cubmasters, Den Leaders, Pack Committee members attend Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials and Cub Scout Leader Specific Training course.
  • Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters attend Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials, Scoutmaster Specific Training, and Outdoor Leader Skills.
  • Troop Committee members attend Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials and Troop Committee Challenge.
  • Venturing Crew Advisors, Assistant Advisors, and Crew Committee members attend Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials and Venturing Leader Specific Training.

Find out more details about adult training on my Trained Leader page.


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Venturing Leadership

Intended for:Venturer Scouts
Details: The Venturing Leadership Award is presented by councils, regions, or National Council to venturers and adults having made exceptional contributions to Venturing and who exemplify the Venturing code.
There are three levels of award:
  • Council: Medallion suspended from blue and white ribbon and worn around the neck. (For unit-, district-, and council-level recognition.)
  • Area/Region: Medallion suspended from green and white ribbon and worn around the neck.
  • National: Medallion suspended from red and white ribbon and worn around the neck.


Knot Description: Silver knot on green/red/blue background with silver border.

Award Requirements:
  • Venturing Leadership Award candidates must be registered and involved in Venturing as a Venturer or an adult for at least one year.
  • Candidates must hold a leadership position or office on the unit, district, council, area, region or national level (as appropriate for the level of award presented).
  • Candidates must show exceptional dedication and give outstanding leadership and service to Venturing and to Venturers on the level appropriate for the award.

Download an application form

See BSA page for more info.

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Venturing Silver

Intended for:Venturer Scouts
Details: The Venturing Silver award will take at least 12 months to earn and all work must be completed before the Venturer's 21st birthday.
Knot Description: Silver knot on dark green and white background with silver border.

Award Requirements:
  • Earn one Venturing Bronze Award.
  • Earn the Venturing Gold Award, which includes knowing and living the Venturing Oath, service, personal development, and 12 months' tenure.
  • Be proficient in emergency preparedness, including earning Standard First Aid and CPR certification, and knowing and using BSA Safe Swim Defense.
  • Demonstrate leadership, including successfully completing the Venturing Leadership Skills Course.
  • Participate in the Ethics in Action program, including Ethical Controversies activities and an Ethics Forum.
  • Show a crew review committee you have met the requirements for the Venturing Silver Award.
Download the Application Form.

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Veteran

Details:
The BSA Veteran award recognizes individual members for tenure in Scouting. The recognition item is a lapel pin denoting the numbe of years of service. This pin is worn only on civilian clothing and not on the scout uniform.

The veteran award is an adult recognition only. However, tenure earned as a youth may be included in the total number of years registered.

Pins can be purchased at the local scout shop after confirmation is received from national records. Currently, 5-year to 90-year pins are available on scoutstuff.org

After five years of registered service in the Boy Scouts of America, an adult may, upon application, receive the designation of "Veteran," provided the person agrees to live up to the Scouting obligations; to keep local Scouting authorities in the community in which residing informed as to availability for service; and further, to be as active in the promotion of the cause of Scouting as circumstances and conditions permit. Service in Scouting organizations other than the Boy Scouts of America does not count toward veteran recognition.
An individual must currently be a registered member of the Boy Scouts of America in order to receive an award.
An adult designated veteran pays the regular registration fee if desiring to continue to retain active connection with the movement.
Scouters desiring recognition as veterans must have maintained an active registered relationship for the required number of years, paying the annual registration fee.
The records of the national office and local council shall determine eligibility.
The periods of service claimed for veteran recognition need not be continuous.

View application form

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Veteran Unit Bar

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Over the past 40 years, as scouting units have remained continuously chartered for longer and longer lengths of time, the Boy Scouts of America have introduced veteran unit bars. These cloth bars recognize units for their longevity.

There is a bar for every 5 years of charter, starting with 25 years. All bars are bronze with black numerals except for the 75 year bar introduced in 1985 and the 100 year bar introduced in 2010. The 75 year bar is red with silver numerals and the 100 year bar is red with gold numerals.

The bar is worn by all unit members, not just those that were members on the specific anniversay.

The bar is sewn on the uniform directly above the unit numerals. Units may choose to order custom one-piece unit numerals with the veteran bar included to reduce the number of patches to sew and ensure they are positioned correctly.

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Webelos Supernova

Intended for:Webelos Scouts
Details:

With help from your parents and unit leader, select a council-approved mentor who is a registered Scouter. Your mentor may not be your parent or unit leader (unless the mentor is working with more than one youth).
If you earned the Cub Scout Supernova award, you must repeat similar requirements while you are a Webelos Scout.

Purchase a Nova awards guidebook, available through local Scout shops. Each guidebook includes a section for the counselor and mentor.



Requirements:
  1. Earn the Scholar AND Scientist AND Engineer Webelos Scout activity badges.
  2. Earn THREE of the following Webelos Scout activity badges: Craftsman, Forester, Geologist, Naturalist, Outdoorsman, and Readyman.
  3. Find interesting facts about Dr. Charles H. Townes using resources in your school or local library or on the Internet (with your parent’s or guardian’s permission and guidance). Then discuss what you learned with your mentor, including answers to the following questions: What very important award did Dr. Townes earn? What was Dr. Townes’ most famous invention?
  4. Find out about five other famous scientists, technology innovators, engineers, or mathematicians approved by your mentor. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  5. Speak with your teacher(s) at school (or your parents if you are home-schooled) OR one of your Cub Scout leaders about your interest in earning the Webelos Scout Supernova award. Ask them why they think math and science are important in your education. Discuss what you learn with your mentor.
  6. Participate in a science project or experiment in your classroom or school. Discuss this activity with your mentor.
  7. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit with someone who works in a STEM-related career. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
    2. Learn about a career that depends on knowledge about science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  8. Under the direct supervision of your mentor, do an experiment that shows how the scientific method (or scientific process) is used. Prepare a short report on the results of your experiment for your mentor.
  9. Participate in a Nova- or other STEM-related activity in your Webelos Scout den or pack meeting that is conducted by a Boy Scout or Venturer who is working on his or her Supernova award. If this is not possible, participate in another Nova- or STEM-related activity in your den or pack meeting.
  10. Submit an application for the Webelos Scout Supernova award to the district Nova or advancement committee for approval.

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Whittling Chip

Intended for:Bear Scouts, Webelos Scouts
Details:Bear scouts and Webelos scouts may earn the privilege of carrying a pocketknife to Cub Scout functions. The objective of this award is to make scouts aware that:

'A Cub Scout knife is an important tool. You can do many things with its blades. The cutting blade is the one you will use most of the time. With it you can make shavings and chips and carve all kinds of things.

You must be very careful when you whittle or carve. Take good care of your knife. Always remember that a knife is a tool, not a toy. Use it with care so that you don't hurt yourself or ruin what you are carving.'


The requirements to earn the Whittling Chip card and patch are:
  1. Complete Bear Achievement 19, Shavings and Chips
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in the use of a pocketknife.
    • Close the blade with the palm of your hand.
    • Never use a knife on something that will dull or break it.
    • Be careful that you do not cut yourself or any person nearby.
    • Never use a knife to strip the bark from a tree.
    • Do not carve your initials into anything that does not belong to you.
  3. Take the Pocketknife Pledge:
    • I will treat my pocketknife with the respect due a useful tool.
    • I will always close my pocketknife and put it away when not in use.
    • I will not use my pocketknife when it might injure someone near me.
    • I promise never to throw my pocketknife for any reason.
    • I will use my pocketknife in a safe manner at all times.


The scout should sign and carry the Whittling Chip card whenever he has his pocketknife.

The Official BSA Whittling Chip for Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts is a Wallet Card (No. 34223A) and/or Patch (08598). The patch is considered a 'temporary' patch and should only be displayed on the uniform sewn centered on the right pocket, or hung in a temporary patch holder from the pocket button. It does NOT get permanently sewn on a pocket flap even though it is shaped that way. You may want to check with your BSA council for local guidelines.




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William T. Hornaday

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The William T. Hornaday Award recognizes Scouts and Scouters for their service to conservation and ecology efforts in their communities. There are seven different Hornaday awards with varying requirements. The youth individual awards are based on earning certain merit badges and completing one or more significant conservation projects.
  • The Silver Medal award is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Boy Scout
  • The Gold Medal is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Scouter. The gold medal may be considered when a qualified Scouter is recommended by his or her council, by an established conservation organization, or by any recognized conservationist. The nominee must have demonstrated leadership and a commitment to the education of youth on a national or international level, reflecting the natural resource conservation/environmental awareness mission of the Boy Scouts of America. Nominations must be approved by the BSA's national conservation committee.
  • A Unit Certificate can be awarded to a pack, troop, or crew of five or more Scouts when at least 60% of then participate in completing a unique, substantial, conservational project, but the square knot is reserved for those earning one of the medals.


These are the merit badges used for the Hornaday awards:
EnergyFishingNature
Environmental ScienceFly-FishingNuclear Science
Fish and Wildlife ManagementGardeningOceanography
ForestryGeologyPlant Science
Public HealthInsect StudyPulp and Paper
Soil and Water ConservationLandscape ArchitectureReptile and Amphibian Study
Bird StudyMammal StudyWeather


The categories for conservation projects are:
  • Energy conservation
  • Soil and water conservation
  • Fish and wildlife management
  • Forestry and range management
  • Air and water pollution control
  • Resource recovery (recycling)
  • Hazardous material disposal and management
  • Invasive species control


Hornaday Awards:
  • Hornaday Badge - Scout earns three of the bold merit badges, plus two others. Complete a project in natural resource conservation, from one of the project categories listed.
  • Hornaday Bronze Medal - Scout earns the Environmental Science merit badge and at least three other bold merit badges, plus two others. Complete three projects from three separate categories listed.
  • Hornaday Silver Medal - Scout earns all bold merit badges, plus any three others. Completes four projects, one each from four of the eight project categories listed.


Knot Description: Green/blue/white on green/blue/white knot on tan background with tan border.

Award Requirements: Download application and nomination forms from BSA Hornaday page.

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Young American

Intended for:Boy Scouts
Details:
The Young American award is given to young adults between the ages of 19 and 25 who have achieved excellence in the fields of art, athletics, business, community service, education, government, humanities, literature, music, religion, or science and have been involved in service to their community, state, or country that adds to the quality of life.


Qualifications:
  • Have reached the age of 19, but will not be 26 years of age by June 1.
  • Have achieved exceptional excellence in one or more of the fields of art, athletics, business, community service, education, government, humanities, literature, music, religion, or science.
  • Have been involved in service in their community, state, or country that adds to the quality of life.
  • Has maintained an above-average scholastic grade point average. (Provide a copy of current school transcript with application.)
  • Must provide with the application at least three letters of recommendation from your troop, crew, school, employer, civic, or community leaders.


Read selection procedure details at BSA Web Page or download Application Form


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