Shotgun Shooting Merit Badge Requirements and Worksheet


Shotgun Shooting Merit Badge

Shotgun Shooting Merit Badge

January, 2014

Requirements for the Shotgun Shooting merit badge:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain why BB and pellet air guns must always be treated with the same respect as firearms.
    2. Describe how you would react if a friend visiting your home asked to see your or your family's firearm(s).
    3. Explain the need for and use and types of eye and hearing protection.
    4. Explain the main points of the laws for owning and using guns in your community and state.
    5. Explain how hunting is related to the wise use of renewable wildlife resources.
    6. Successfully complete a state hunter education course, or obtain a copy of the hunting laws for your state, then do the following:
      1. Explain the main points of hunting laws in your state and give any special laws on the use of guns or ammunition, and
      2. List the kinds of wildlife that can be legally hunted in your state.
    7. Explain to your counselor the proper hygienic guidelines used in shooting.
    8. Identify and explain three shotgun sports. Identify places in your community where you could shoot these sports and explain how you can join or be a part of shooting sports activities.
    9. Give your counselor a list of sources that you could contact for information on firearms and their use.
  2. Do ONE of the following options:

    OPTION A: SHOTGUN SHOOTING (Modern Shotshell Type)
    1. Identify the principal parts of a shotgun, action types, and how they function.
    2. Identify and demonstrate the rules for safely handling a shotgun.
    3. Identify the parts of a shotgun shell and their functions.
    4. Identify the various gauges of shotguns. Explain which one you would use and why.
    5. Identify and demonstrate the fundamentals of safely shooting a shotgun. Explain what a misfire, hangfire, and squib fire are, and explain the procedures to follow in response to each.
    6. Identify and explain each rule for shooting a shotgun safely.
    7. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot moving targets, using the fundamentals of shotgun shooting.
    8. Identify the materials needed to clean a shotgun.
    9. Demonstrate how to clean a shotgun properly and safely.
    10. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a shotgun.
    11. Shooting score required. - Hit at least 12 out of 25 targets (48 percent) in two 25-target groups. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order. A minimum of 50 shots must be fired.

    Shooting skill rules:

    • Targets may be thrown by a hand trap, manual mechanical trap, or on any trap or skeet field. Note: If using a hand trap or manual mechanical trap, the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the right and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. If throwing left-handed with a hand trap the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the left and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter.
    • All targets should be thrown at a reasonable speed and in the same direction.
    • Targets should be generally thrown so as to climb in the air after leaving the trap.
    • Scores may be fired at any time, either in formal competition or in practice.
    • Any gauge shotgun not exceeding 12 gauge may be used.
    • Only commercially manufactured ammunition may be used. Reloads may not be used in BSA shooting sports programs.
    • Shooters must shoot in rounds of 25. Rounds need not be shot continuously or on the same day (the term 'round' refers to a single series of 25 shots).
    • If using a trap field, shoot station 3 with traps set to throw straightaway targets.
    • If using a skeet field, shoot station 7 low house.


    OPTION B: MUZZLELOADING SHOTGUN SHOOTING
    1. Discuss a brief history of the development of the muzzleloading shotgun.
    2. Identify principal parts of percussion and flintlock shotguns and discuss how they function.
    3. Demonstrate and discuss the rules for safely handling a muzzleloading shotgun.
    4. Identify the various grades of black powder and their proper and safe use.
    5. Discuss proper safety procedures pertaining to black powder use and storage.
    6. Discuss proper components of a load.
    7. Identify proper procedures and accessories used for safely loading a muzzleloading shotgun.
    8. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot a muzzleloading shotgun on a range, including range procedures. Explain what a misfire, hangfire, and squib fire are, and explain the procedures to follow in response to each.
    9. Shoot a moving target with a muzzleloading shotgun using the five fundamentals of firing the shot.
    10. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzleloading shotgun properly and safely.
    11. Demonstrate how to clean a muzzleloading shotgun safely.
    12. Identify the causes of a muzzleloading shotgun's failure to fire and explain or demonstrate proper preventative procedures.
    13. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzleloading shotgun.
    14. Shooting score required. : Hit at least 5 out of 15 targets in each of two 15-target groups. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order. A minimum of 30 shots must be fired.

    Shooting skill rules:

    • Targets may be thrown by a hand trap, manual mechanical trap, or on any trap or skeet field. Note: if using a hand trap or manual mechanical trap, the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the right and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. If throwing left-handed with a hand trap the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the left and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter.
    • All targets should be thrown at a reasonable speed and in the same direction.
    • Targets should be generally thrown so as to climb in the air after leaving trap.
    • Scores may be fired at any time, either in formal competition or in practice.
    • Any gauge shotgun not exceeding 10 gauge may be used.
    • Standard clay targets customarily used for trap and skeet are to be used.
    • On a standard trap field, the shooter should be positioned 8 yards behind the trap house. The trap should be set to throw only straightaway targets.
    • If using a skeet field, shoot station 7 low house.

Shotgun Shooting Worksheet



Comments:
 Feb 23, 2014 - Tiffani Jacobs
This is a great tool. Not all scouts can go out and buy the merit badge book.  Some scout stores are just too far to drive. I use this site not only for my son but other members in out troop.
Thank you.
Jun 17, 2014 - Terry Bacon
I don't see the reasoning behind the rule that a shooter must shoot at least 50 shots if he hits the 24 targets before he reaches that number. It is wasteful to just have to shoot the balance " because".
Jun 20, 2014 - Scouter Paul
@Terry - If a scout hits 12, then hits 12 more, he has reached the score and could be Thrifty by conserving the remaining 26 clays and shells.  
There may be some other reason to shoot the remaining, but I don't see it.
Jul 15, 2014 - RON TUFANKJIAN
I agree with the waste of ammo/clays etc..I score by using the LAST 50 shots also ..... If a scout is not performing well the first few days and shoots 60 times, then the first 10 shots he took are eliminated ..if he shoots 70 times the first 20 are eliminated...My success ratio is good and the scouts are rewarded if they gradually get better ...  Some scouts get 24 out of 29 .. I am not going to waste ammo and clays letting him shoot 21 more times just to shoot 50 times ... of course, we keep all scouts shooting after the shooting requirement is met.. hand throwing ..skeet type throwing.. team challenges ..  snapping gun up from the gun ready position etc... been doing it since 1996..Write me directly for any comments or questions .. RTufankjia@msn.com ...Ron Tufankjian
Jul 15, 2014 - RON TUFANKJIAN
Where is the answer to question 1B ??  It used to be in the pamphlet but is not in the pamphlet now .. I still have a copy of the old pamphlet that answers the question by stating to show the friends the gun in a safe manner etc etc.. Which I did years ago when I was a youngster ..But now ??  I suggest Boy Scouts answer the question in the pamphlet.. I spoke about this during Camp School ...the pamphlet still does not answer the 1B question..
Aug 26, 2014 - Kevin J. Hough
I'm in agreement with 24 of 50, always have been.  I don't need to see 24 dead birds to know that a Scout understands the fundamentals of shotgun/clay shooting.  I like taking em' to a regular clay course.  Giving them a wide variety of targets including more challenging ones (jumping from a softer to a harder course).  And they hit the hard targets as well em.  And they love the challenge....especially when the CRUSH the targets.
Aug 31, 2014 - Ron Snowden
I disagree!!  First of all, most kids that have little or no experience aren't going to hit 24 quickly enough to "conserve" a significant amount of ammo.  Secondly, part of the program is for the kid to have a good time.  If his shoulder is hurting, or some other reason, then once he scores the required 24 then he should't have to shoot the rest.  But, being a kid, he most likely will like enjoy the experience and want to keep shooting.    What is better, having the kid shoot up a few rounds, or take them home to possibly play with?

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