Cub Scout and Boy Scout Awards


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75th Anniversary

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

2005 marked the 75th anniversary for Cub Scouts in the Boy Scouts of America (1930-2005). All Cub Scouts, Scout Leaders and family members during the Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary could earn Special Edition Awards. Each 75th Anniversary Award utilizes a special patch. Read about each Cub Scout 75th Anniversary Award to learn about the fun requirements for earning each award.

These awards need to be orderd through your local Council. Please check with them to ensure they have the awards available.

Requirements:


Youth Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. With an adult family member, talk to someone who was living in 1930 when Cub Scouting was founded. Find out what life was like for that person as a child - games played, subjects studied in school, family pastimes, and such. Draw a picture illustrating one of these activities.
  3. With your den or family members, take part in a skit, song, or ceremony or tell a story about the history of Cub Scouting or the values it represents.
  4. Make a puppet showing one of the characters from Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book. You can learn about these characters in the Cub Scout handbooks. Use your puppet in a puppet show.
  5. Draw an illustration of the United States flag as it looked in 1930. Explain what changes have been made in the flag since then and why. Tell how you can show respect for the flag.
  6. Participate in a pack, district or council derby. Decorate your entry to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.
  7. Choose a sport from the Cub Scout Academics & Sports program. Learn about someone who has played this sport during the past 75 years. Play the sport with your den, pack, friends, or family.
  8. Learn how some methods of transportation have changed in the past 75 years. Create a model or sculpture of one means of transportation that was used in 1930.
  9. List five methods of communication commonly used today. Tell how many of these existed in 1930. Use one method of communication to invite a non-Scouting friend to a 75th Anniversary activity and invite him to join.
  10. Design a greeting card for the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. Send the card to a friend or relative, with a note telling item about your favorite Cub Scout activities and why Cub Scouting is important to you.



Leader Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Create posters, fliers, or other media to promote 75th Anniversary celebration events at three den, pack, district, or council events.
  3. Serve on a committee in your pack, district, or council to plan an event to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting (different from activity 1).
  4. Learn about a game that boys played in 1930. Teach the game to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  5. Using materials that would have been available in 1930, teach a craft to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  6. Learn a song that was popular in 1930. Teach the song to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  7. Take photographs or write an article about how your den, pack, district, or council is celebrating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. Submit to a local newspaper for publication.
  8. Create a costume and wear it to tell a story about the history of Cub Scouting to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable. (Resources include youth handbooks and Cub Scout Leader Book.)
  9. Invite a career professional (firefighter, police officer, banker, retail professional, etc.) to speak at a Cub Scout activity or training event, highlighting how his/her profession has changed in the past 75 years.
  10. Read Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book to familiarize yourself with the characters Baden-Powell incorporated into Cub Scouting.



Family Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Invite another family to attend a 75th Anniversary event or activity to learn more about Cub Scouting and how to join.
  3. Visit a business, landmark, or other site or structure in your community that is at least 75 years old. Talk to a representative about how the location has changed in the past 75 years.
  4. As a family, make a list of household items that would not have existed 75 years ago. Discuss what might have been used instead and how life was different without these items.
  5. Bake a cake, pie, cookies, or other dessert using ingredients that would have been available 75 years ago. Decorate the dessert with a Cub Scout theme.
  6. Start a family scrapbook or add to an existing one. Include photographs or memorabilia from at least six different Scouting activities.
  7. Make a family time capsule with each family including items that represent what is important to him or her. Decide on a future date on which to open the capsule together.
  8. As a family, read an article together from Boy's Life magazine (accessible via the Internet at www.boyslife.org). Talk about how this article would have been different had it been written 75 years ago.
  9. Draw a family time line going back at least 75 years. Include significant dates such as birthdays, weddings, and when family members joined Scouting. Mark 1930 as the year Cub Scouting began.
  10. Find a picture or photograph of the Cub Scout uniform in 1930. Discuss how the uniform has changed. Have each family member draw a picture of what they think the Cub Scout uniform might look like 75 years in the future.



Pack Award
Complete Requirement 1 and complete 5 other activities.
  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a Blue and Gold Banquet.)
  2. Conduct an open house or recruiting event (an indoor event or help outdoors at a local park or other facility) to introduce new families to Cub Scouting and emphasize how Scouting's values have remained constant throughout Cub Scouting's 75-year history.
  3. Take part in a parade or other community event through which your pack can promote the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.
  4. Conduct a pack derby in which boys are encouraged to decorate entries with a 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting theme.
  5. Using the history of Cub Scouting as the theme, conduct an outdoor campfire program.
  6. Conduct a pack service project, such as Good Turn for America, that promotes and reinforces the concept of 75 years of Cub Scouts helping others. As a pack, contribute at least 75 hours of service.
  7. Work with your chartered organization to recognize Cub Scouting's 75th Anniversary in the organization's correspondence, newsletter, or other media.
  8. Prepare a photo display for your chartered organization or other community location, highlighting activities of your pack today and in years past. This may also include photos from other family members who were in Scouting.
  9. Appoint a pack historian to document pack events during the 75th Anniversary celebration. The historian may add to an existing scrapbook or history or may begin a scrapbook or other record that the pack can build on in the future.
  10. At your chartered organization, local park, or other community site, plant a tree to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting.


Also available for the qualifying Cub Scout Pack is a special Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary Award Pack Ribbon.
 
 
Cub Scouts 75th Anniversary Award Patches

Unit Leaders can order the following items when requirements have been fulfilled for the special Cub Scout 75th Anniversary Awards

Item Number Description Price
75001 Youth Award—Patch with red border. For Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts. $3.95
75002 Leader Award—Patch with blue border. For any registered leader who works with Cub Scouts. $3.95
75003 Family Award—Patch with yellow border. For all Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and family members. $3.95
75004 Pack Award—Patch with silver border. For each youth and adult member of qualifying packs. $3.95
17836 Pack Award—Ribbon streamer for pack flag. $15.50 (pkg 10)

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BSA Family

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

The BSA Family Award program offers activities to help strengthen all families - whether two-parent, single-parent, or nontraditional. This program helps families accomplish worthy goals while building and strengthening relationships among family members. All family members are encouraged to participate and may earn the award.

Some packs, through a volunteer family program chair, actively encourage and support families pursuing this award. If your pack does not promote and support the family program, your family may still participate on its own. The BSA Family Activity Book (available at your local council service center) gives all the requirements as well as step-by-step instructions for earning the BSA Family Award.

BSA Family award

To earn the award, a family must complete 10 activities within a 12-month period. The family chooses one activity in two topics in each of the following categories:

  • Learning Through Fun and Adventure
  • Strengthening Family Relationships
  • Developing Personal Strengths
  • Teaching Responsibility
  • Handling Difficult Situations

When a family has completed the requirements, all family members are eligible to receive an award certificate, patches for uniform wear, and/or pins for non-uniform wear.
The patch is a temporary emblem to be displayed centered on the right pocket or on a patch vest.

The BSA Family Activity Book is the primary resource for the BSA Family Award program. It is filled with suggested activities to enhance the children's personal development and enrich and strengthen the family.

The BSA Family Activity Book is divided into five categories that include several topics of interest to families. Each topic contains suggested activities for a family to do together. These activities could include going on field trips; telling stories; doing arts and crafts projects; playing games; participating in family discussions; or making lists, charts, and scrapbooks.

cub scout family award

Most of the ideas in the BSA Family Activity Book will be useful during family meetings or gatherings. However, parents will also find ways to incorporate them into daily life. Many ideas may be adapted for use while riding in a car and during mealtimes, and may provide things to occupy children when they say there is "nothing to do." In short, parents may use the ideas and activities to meet their own family's needs and interests.

Included with most topics are recommended books for adults and children to read together. One can find these (or other books) at a local public library. Adults and children may take turns reading aloud. There are many wonderful books to help explain or illustrate any topic the family explores.

The BSA Family Activity Book is available at your local council service center or wherever Scouting merchandise is sold. Visit www.scoutstuff.org to find a list of Scouting retailers in your area.


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Centennial Quality Unit

Intended for:All Scouts
Notes:This program has been replaced by the Journey to Excellence program starting in 2011.
Details:

The Centennial Quality Awards program is designed to recognize units, districts, councils, areas, and regions for achieving excellence in providing a quality program to a growing youth population in America at all levels of the Boy Scouts of America.

The Centennial Quality Award is named in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
The award began in 2007 and continues until 2010. Each year that you qualify, you will qualify to receive recognition for that year.
There was a red background in 2007, a white background in 2008, a blue background in 2009, and 2010 will have a red, white, and blue background.

Special note: If earned all four years, a special distinction will be available to recognize groups who qualify in 2010.

The award patch is displayed on the uniform's right sleeve below the patrol emblem or den numeral. Only the most recent year's patch is worn, not a string of past year patches.

centennial quality unit award
2007 quality unit award
2008 quality unit award
2009 quality unit award
2010 quality unit award

The BSA National Strategic Plan is guided by five pillars supported by measurable, specific goals. The plan requires immediate and continued attention to each pillar. Each year there will be an emphasis on one of the pillars.

  • 2006—Emphasized research in guiding our movement.
  • 2007—Focused on helping every local council to become fiscally sound.
  • 2008—Launch a campaign to engage 1 million new volunteers.
  • 2009—Salute chartered organizations and strategic alliances and highlight our tradition of service.
  • 2010—Celebrate our 100th anniversary.


See BSA Info page for award details, commitment forms, achievement forms, order forms, and FAQ pages.


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Crime Prevention

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

The Boy Scouts of America's Crime Prevention Program assists neighborhoods and communities in their efforts to prevent crime by emphasizing youth, family, and community.

The Crime Prevention Award
Recognitions consisting of patches, wallet cards, certificates, and pins are available. All participants, including those not registered in Scouting, are eligible to earn the Crime Prevention Award provided they fulfill the requirements of the two phases outlined below and detailed on the application form.

January, 2007: I contacted BSA National about this award after hearing from someone that they could not get the patch locally. BSA replied that the Crime Prevention emblem IS in stock, however, this is a restricted item and can only be obtained through your local council. If your council does not have this in stock, they can order it. It is item #04189.

Phase I-Youth and Family
Youth and family members fulfill this phase of the award by completing the activities outlined on the application form for this phase, and having a parent and/or unit leader sign the application form afterward.

Phase II-Youth and Unit
This phase of the award is completed by:

  1. Securing the approval of a unit leader for a crime prevention project, either an original project or a project of a neighborhood- or community-based organization;
  2. Participating with your unit, den, patrol, friends, family, neighborhood, or community in the crime prevention project; and
  3. Having a parent and/or unit leader sign the application form afterward.

Once both phases have been completed, the unit leader must sign the application. Awards may be purchased at the local council service center.

Download the Cub Scout Application Form
or the Boy Scout Application Form.


Information for the Parent or Unit Leader

Youth
When working on crime prevention with youth, help them learn the importance of the following:

  • Settle arguments with words, not fists or weapons. Do not stand around and watch while others are arguing; violence often spreads into groups of bystanders.
  • Learn safe routes and good places to find help in the neighborhood. Trust your feelings; if you sense danger, get away fast. Report any crimes or suspicious actions or individuals to the police, school authorities, or parents.
  • Do not open the door to anyone you do not know and trust. Never go anywhere with someone you do not know and trust.
  • Whenever you leave home, tell parents, relatives, or other responsible adults where you are going, who you will be with, and when you expect to be home.
  • Do not use alcohol or other drugs.
  • Stick with friends who are not violent and who do not use alcohol or drugs. Avoid known 'trouble spots' and difficult situations.
  • If someone tries to abuse you or touch you inappropriately, yell no, get away, and tell a trusted adult.
  • Get involved in making your neighborhood safer. Join with your neighbors, neighborhood associations, and local schools in these efforts.
  • Help teach younger children how to avoid being victims of crime. Set a good example for them, and explain why it's important to be safe.

Family
Addressing crime prevention through families is one of the most effective ways to combat the problem. Here are some important topics for family or one-on-one discussion:

  • Children need to feel that someone cares enough to protect them. Adults need to set limits, rules, and standards for children. Discuss the reasons for and importance of these boundaries.
  • Children need to talk about violent situations they might witness or be involved in. How might such violent situations be avoided? How can children prevent such situations from happening to themselves or their family and friends? What is a loving and supportive environment, and how is it created?
  • Why is it important to be trustworthy? How does someone earn a reputation for trustworthiness? How does someone lose that reputation, and what does it feel like? Discuss how one small violation of trust can lead to larger ethical compromises.
  • Is it right to 'narc on' someone you know? How does silence allow crime to flourish? Discuss ways to tell the truth about someone else's actions without suffering reprisals. Give examples.
  • It can be difficult to develop a sense of respect and appreciation for one's family, community, and world. Discuss focusing on positive things-not just problems.

The following strategies and projects can involve individuals or whole families in preventing crime:

  • Don't keep or temporarily place weapons where children have access to them. A parent's attitude and example can be extremely influential when it comes to weapons.
  • Get to know neighbors and help your children develop trust with them. Increase the awareness of everyone in your neighborhood of situations that could attract crime - for example, empty houses, open garage doors, unaccompanied children.
  • Stay in touch with your children and have them stay in touch with you. Teach them how to contact you and how to find another trusted adult any time they need help.
  • Offer the use of your home as a refuge and a reliable source of help for children who are frightened or need assistance.
  • Organize, join, or participate in your neighborhood's or community's crime watch efforts. Help educate others about crime prevention.

Neighborhood/Community
When you focus on community crime prevention, consider participating in the following programs:

  • Neighborhood watch
  • Child identification
  • The McGruff program
  • Safety for the elderly
  • Local police or sheriff's department initiatives
  • Church- or school-based anticrime initiatives

Consider these suggestions for crime prevention projects:

  • Work with local schools and parks to establish drug-free, weapon-free zones. Build a partnership with police. Focus on solving problems instead of reacting to crises.
  • Help develop community pride by cleaning up the neighborhood. Involve the whole community. Contact the departments of public works or parks and recreation for specific ideas, guidance, or suggestions.
  • Build a phone list of local organizations that offer counseling, job training, guidance, and other services that provide positive options to at-risk youth and families. Distribute the list in your neighborhood using local libraries, recreation centers, and other facilities.



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Cub Scout Conservation Good Turn

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
Conservation has always been an integral part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Scouts have rendered distinguished public service by helping to conserve wildlife, energy, forests, soil, and water. Past generations of Scouts have been widely recognized for undertaking conservation Good Turn action projects in their local communities.

The Conservation Good Turn is an opportunity for Cub Scout packs to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

Conservation projects should involve the entire Cub Scout pack - scouts, leaders, and family members. Hands-on projects help Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts realize that everyone can do things to care for the environment. Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

Agencies to contact for project ideas:
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • local City Works department
  • Audobon Society
  • Trout Unlimited

Some suggested projects could be:
  • Plant grasses, trees, shrubs, and ground cover to stop soil erosion.
  • As a den or pack, adopt a park and keep it clean.
  • Organize or participate in a recycling program.
  • Participate in a beach or waterfront cleanup. Record the items collected and determine the possible harmful effects to wildlife.
  • Establish a nature trail, plant vegetation, or carry out other needed projects as requested by the camp ranger at a local BSA camp property.


The patch can be worn as a temporary insignia or on the scout's patch vest.


Pick up an application form from your local council office or
use this Application Form

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Cub Scout Outdoor Activity

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:

Cub Scouts at all levels from Tiger to Webelos can earn the Outdoor Activity Award. When the award is first earned, the scout receives the pocket flap award, worn on the right pocket flap of his uniform. In each additional year that he earns the award, a wolf track pin is attached to the flap. The Summertime Pack Award pin should be pinned through this patch just like the wolf track pins.
Successive years should build on skills and experiences from earlier years, having the scouts participate in more extensive activities.

Requirements:
Scouts at all ranks must attend Cub Scout day camp or Cub Scout/Webelos Scout resident camp in the current program year.

Tiger Cubs
Complete one requirement in Achievement 5, 'Let's Go Outdoors' (Tiger Cub Handbook) and complete three of the outdoor activities listed below.

Wolf Cub Scouts
Assemble the 'Six Essentials for Going Outdoors' (Wolf Handbook, Elective 23b) and discuss their purpose, and complete four of the outdoor activities listed below.

Bear Cub Scouts
Earn the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Award (Bear Handbook, Elective 25h) and complete five of the outdoor activities listed below.

Webelos Scouts
Earn the Outdoorsman Activity Badge (Webelos Handbook) and complete six of the outdoor activities listed below.

Outdoor Activities:
With your den, pack, or family:
  1. Participate in a nature hike in your local area. This can be on an organized, marked trail, or just a hike to observe nature in your area.
  2. Participate in an outdoor activity such as a picnic or park fun day.
  3. Explain the buddy system and tell what to do if lost. Explain the importance of cooperation.
  4. Attend a pack overnighter. Be responsible by being prepared for the event.
  5. Complete an outdoor service project in your community.
  6. Complete a nature/conservation project in your area. This project should involve improving, beautifying, or supporting natural habitats. Discuss how this project helped you to respect nature.
  7. Earn the Summertime Pack Award.
  8. Participate in a nature observation activity. Describe or illustrate and display your observations at a den or pack meeting.
  9. Participate in an outdoor aquatic activity. This can be an organized swim meet or just a den or pack swim.
  10. Participate in an outdoor campfire program. Perform in a skit, sing a song, or take part in a ceremony.
  11. Participate in an outdoor sporting event.
  12. Participate in an outdoor Scout's Own or other worship service.
  13. Explore a local city, county, state, or national park. Discuss with your den how a good citizen obeys the park rules.


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Cub Scout World Conservation

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Cub Scouts to 'think globally' and 'act locally' to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources and that we are interdependent with our world environment.

The Cub Scout version of the World Conservation Award can be earned by Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scouts, but not by Tigers.

This is considered a 'temporary patch' and should be displayed centered on the right pocket. It can be sewn on or displayed in a plastic patch holder hung from the pocket button.

This award can be earned only once while you are in Cub Scouting
(i.e. as either a Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scout).

As a Wolf Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #7 - Your Living World
  • Complete all Arrow Points in 2 of the following 3 Electives:
    • #13 - Birds
    • #15 - Grow Something
    • #19 - Fishing
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above


As a Bear Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #5 - Sharing Your World with Wildlife
  • Complete all requirements in 2 of the following 3 electives:
    • #2 - Weather
    • #12 - Nature Crafts
    • #15 - Water and Soil Conservation
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above.


As a Webelos Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Earn the Forester activity badge.
  • Earn the Naturalist activity badge.
  • Earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project.


Download or complete this Application Form

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Emergency Preparedness

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

When a member has fulfilled the requirements, a completed application is submitted to the council. Upon approval, an Emergency Preparedness pin is awarded. The pin may be worn on civilian clothing or on the uniform, centered on the left pocket flap. The award may be earned more than once; for instance, as a young person advances through the ranks and is capable of more complex preparedness activities, but only one pin may be worn.




All emergency activities carried out by Scouting units must be appropriate for the ages and abilities of the young people involved. Units should participate only under the supervision of their own leaders, and plans for unit help must be coordinated with community agencies responsible for disaster preparedness.

Tiger Cub Requirements


  1. Complete Tiger Cub Achievement 3-Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe. This achievement covers a family fire plan and drill and what to do if separated from the family.

  2. Complete Tiger Cub Elective 27-Emergency! This elective helps a Tiger Cub be ready for emergencies and dangerous situations and has him discuss a family emergency plan with his family.

  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of these three activities.
    • Take the American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT) course.
    • Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
    • Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Wolf Cub Scout Requirements


  1. Complete Wolf Cub Scout Achievement 9*-Be Safe at Home and on the Street. This is a check of your home to keep it safe.
  2. Complete Wolf Cub Scout Elective 16*-Family Alert. This elective is about designing a plan for your home and family in case an emergency takes place.
  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
    • Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.
    • Join a Safe Kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.


Bear Cub Scout Requirements


  1. Complete Bear Cub Scout Achievement 11*-Be Ready. The focus of this achievement is the best way to handle emergencies.
  2. Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf Cub Scout:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more..
    • Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
    • Organize a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.


Webelos Scout Requirements

  1. Earn the Readyman activity badge from the community badge group.
  2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project. Here is a Emergency Kit Checklist to help.
  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf or Bear Cub Scout:
    • Take a first aid course conducted by your local American Red Cross chapter.
    • Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.
    • Organize a training program for your Webelos den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

Boy Scout and Varsity Scout Requirements

  1. Participate in creating an emergency plan for your home and for your troop or team's Scouting activities. Be sure you know thedetails of both emergency plans.
  2. Earn the First Aid or the Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
  3. With your troop or team, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training conducted by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Venturer Requirements

  1. Complete all of the Emergency Preparedness core requirement number 4 (page 17, Ranger Guidebook).
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Complete the First Aid core requirement (page 16, Ranger Guidebook This may be fulfilled either by completing the standard American Red Cross first aid course When Help Is Delayed or by completing the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Course.
    • With your crew, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training coordinated by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Unit Volunteer Scouter Requirements


This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members.

Do any three of the following:

  • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  • Participate actively in preparing an emergency plan of action for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Take a basic first aid/CPR course, or participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.

Council/District Volunteer Scouter Requirements


Do any three of the following:

  • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  • Take a basic first aid/CPR course.
  • Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for emergency disaster preparedness.
  • Participate actively in developing an emergency preparedness program for a council or district activity. Example: a camporee, Scouting show, fun day, etc.

Resources


  • http://www.ready.gov
  • Local chapter of the American Red Cross (emergency procedures and training)
  • Other local disaster relief agencies
  • Local law enforcement agencies (McGruff and other safe kids programs)
  • For youth requirements and electives, see the program book for that rank or part of the Scouting program.

Program Items


All Emergency Preparedness BSA items are available to local councils as Supply items, though the National Distribution Center.

  • Emergency Preparedness BSA pin, No. 00540 (civilian wear/uniform, centered on left pocket flap). Awarded when requirements are met. Only one pin may be worn.
  • Emergency Preparedness BSA information pocket card, No. 32185
  • Emergency Preparedness BSA support recognition certificate (8' x 10'), No. 32186





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Founder's Bar

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
In celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America, the New-Unit Task Force announces the Founder’s Bar recognition. This recognition is intended to emphasize the importance and pride of forming and nurturing a new Scouting unit.

The Founder’s Bar is worn by all youth and adults whose names are on a new-unit charter or who officially join the new unit before the unit recharters for the first time.

This recognition is not just for new units - original charter members of units created prior to 2010 can also wear this patch, as long as the unit is still in operation and the person is still a member.

Though the bar looks similar to an Interpreter's Strip, it is worn on the left sleeve below the unit numerals.
The patch, pocket certificate, and full-size certificate are available at local scout shops.

See BSA Details page.

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Good Turn for America

Intended for:All Scouts
Notes:This program was implemented in 2004 and ended in 2010.
Details:

Good Turn for America is a collaboration between the Boy Scouts of America and the Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity, American Red Cross, and thousands of other community organizations that focuses the power of volunteerism on important community issues. The three main issues addressed are: hunger, lack of adequate shelter, and poor health


Good Turn for America goals include the following:
  • Inspire youth and adult leaders in and out of Scouting to higher levels of service and volunteerism.
  • Provide additional program experiences to help youth members learn qualities of good citizenship and gain a sense of belonging to and being needed in their communities.
  • Build service collaborations with community organizations across every community in the country.
  • Affirm the BSA as the nation's leading collaborating organization in community service.
  • Heighten our nation's awareness of BSA's service commitment to all communities and citizens.


There are three major program areas.
  1. Scouting for Food Activities in Collaboration With The Salvation Army or Other Local Organizations. As unbelievable as it may seem, hunger remains a significant problem in the United States. In fact, one in five children in this country faces hunger. Hungry children, even those who experience only mild malnutrition during the critical stages of their development, may suffer irreparable harm.
    The BSA is concerned about hunger and helping community agencies provide food for the needy.
  2. Scouting for Shelter Activities in Collaboration With Habitat for Humanity or Other Local Organizations.
    The Urban Institute estimates that 3.5 million people in the United States, 1.35 million of them children, will experience homelessness during the course of a year. The need for simple, decent housing continues to grow in American communities.
    The BSA is concerned about shelter to the needy and improving the quality of life of those who must live in group homes or shelters.
  3. Scouting for Healthy Living Activities in Collaboration With the American Red Cross or Other Local Organizations.
    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It is a major risk factor for the number one cause of death: heart disease. Heart disease can be reduced by proper exercise and diet. Our children are being raised in an increasingly sedentary society, and obesity is a major health concern for youth. One out of five obese youth develops diabetes. Some researchers predict that today's children will be the first generation of Americans whose life expectancy will actually be shorter than that of their parents. The culprit, they say, is the health problems associated with obesity.
    The BSA is an organization that has always been concerned about the physical fitness and good health of Americans.

  4.  
     
    It takes a bit of work to ge through the 'paperwork' to receive the patches for this award. 
       
    • One designated person in each unit should contact a local council executive to get a unit-specific ID number. This ID allows the unit to access the www.goodturnforamerica.org web site and enter project hours.
    •  
    • Once project data is entered, the unit designee prints a certificate from the web site.
    •  
    • The certificate is presented to the local Scout Shop to allow the unit to purchase appropriate patches and segments.
    •  
    • The patches are presented to scouts at an appropriate ceremony.
    •  
     

    See GoodTurnForAmerica.org - (replaced by Journey to Excellence site)

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Heroism

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details:(Discontinued Dec. 2012)
The Heroism Award is presented to Scouts and Scouters that have saved or attempted to save a life at minimal personal risk.
This award may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life while registered in the Boy Scouts of America.

If it appears that the risk involved was merely in the performance of duty or the meeting of an obligation because of responsibility to supervise and give leadership to the person or people whose lives were saved, then recognition will not be given. The BSA National Court of Honor determines from evidence presented which lifesaving award, if any, shall be made. The court will give consideration to resourcefulness and demonstrated skills used in rescue methods.

Knot Description: Red on red knot on white background with white border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form.

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Honor Medal

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The Honor Medal is presented to Scouts and Scouters who have shown courage in attempting to save a life with personal risk.
This award has been presented posthumously to Scouts who have died while attempting to save the life of another.
In very exceptional cases the award is presented with crossed gold palms to Scouts and Scouters who have attempted to save a life at great personal risk demonstrating exceptional heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness.

Knot Description: Red on green knot on tan background with yellow border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form. The National Court of Honor decides the merits of a submitted act and decides which, if any, recognition is awarded.

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International Activity

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:Discontinued in 2012 - see International Spirit Award

The International Activity Award is awarded to registered Youth and Adult Leaders involved in heightening awareness and cultural exchange with Scouts from other countries.

The patch is worn centered on the right pocket since it is a temporary emblem.



The specific requirements for earning this recognition are up to individual councils to define. BSA National has published some Suggested Criteria but you should check with your council for exact requirements.


Here are a few application forms available from various councils:

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International Spirit

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

The International Spirit Award is awarded to registered Youth and Adult Leaders that have broadened knowledge of international Scouting and increased appreciation and awareness of different cultures and countries.

The patch is worn centered on the right pocket since it is a temporary emblem.




Requirements:

Cub Scouts
  1. Earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award.
  2. Earn the Language and Culture Belt Loop.
  3. Participate in Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet.
  4. Complete two of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Boy Scouts/Varsity/Venturer
  1. Earn the Boy Scout or Venturing World Conservation Award.
  2. Earn the Citizenship in the World Merit Badge.
    (Alternative for Venturers: Complete the "Understanding Other Cultures" requirement of the TRUST Award.)
  3. Participate in Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet.
  4. Complete three of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Scouter
  1. Learn about the World Organization of the Scout Movement (scout.org). Explain what it is to your unit or at a district roundtable, and describe at least three ways the website can be used to help promote or increase participation in international Scouting.
  2. Check out the most current International Department newsletter (scouting.org/international/newsletter) and promote at least two items from the newsletter within your unit or at a district roundtable.
  3. Help organize or participate in two Jamboree-on-the-Air or Jamboree-on-the-Internet events.
  4. Complete four of the 10 Experience Requirements below.



Experience Requirements
  1. Host an international Scout or unit and plan activities to help you learn about Scouting in their country.
  2. Learn about another country and prepare a dinner traditionally served there. Explain what you learned to friends or family as you share the meal.
  3. Participate in a World Scout Jamboree, international camporee, or another international Scout event. Share the experience with your unit or at a district roundtable.
  4. Take a trip to another country as an individual, with your family, or Scout unit and include a visit with another Scout unit or event. When you return home, share the experience with another unit.
  5. Organize a World Friendship Fund collection at a unit meeting or district roundtable.*
  6. Earn the Interpreter Strip.
  7. Research Scouting in another country. Make a presentation at a unit meeting or district roundtable.
  8. Contact your local council's international representative and assist them with at least two items they need help with promoting.
  9. Research the process of obtaining a U.S. passport. Create a fact sheet for your unit or district to assist them with requirements for traveling internationally.
  10. Research a region of the World Organization of the Scout Movement. Make a presentation at a unit meeting or district roundtable.

Note: Experience Requirement #5 is mandatory.

See award application

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James E. West Fellowship

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: James E. West served as the first Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America for over 30 years.
The West Fellowship award is available for gifts of $1,000 or more to a council endowment fund. The gift must be in addition to - and not replace or diminish - the donor's annual Friends of Scouting support.
The James E. West Fellowship Award is an 8-by-10-inch certificate, personalized with the donor's name, date of gift, and council name.
In addition, there will be a distinctive lapel pin/charm and an embroidered square knot for uniform wear. While it is a national recognition, the James E. West Fellowship award is authorized and presented by the local council.
A registered BSA member of any age can receive this award.

Knot Description: Gold on green knot on tan background with red border.





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Journey to Excellence

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

"Scouting’s Journey to Excellence" is the BSA’s council performance recognition program designed to encourage and reward success and measure the performance of units, districts, and councils. It replaces the Centennial Quality Awards program as a means of encouraging excellence in providing a quality program at all levels of the BSA.

Starting in January 2011, a new quality program called Journey to Excellence (JTE or sometimes J2E) has become the new national performance assessment, communication, and recognition program for units, as well as for councils and districts.

Many additional details are available on the BSA page.


The award patch is displayed on the uniform's right sleeve below the patrol emblem or den numeral. Only the most recent year's patch is worn, not a string of past year patches.

journey to excellence gold
journey to excellence silver
journey to excellence bronze

The Journey to Excellence program provides:

  • A framework for planning the year
  • A method for evaluating a unit
  • Guidance in areas where a unit might do better
  • Specific guidelines and standards of what is considered good performance
  • Early warning of potential problem areas
  • Recognition for good Scouting
  • Benchmarking to get ideas and tips from other good units


See BSA Info page for award details, forms, and FAQ pages.


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Leave No Trace Cub Scout

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
Leave No Trace is a plan that helps people to be more concerned about their environment and to help them protect it for future generations. Leave No Trace applies in a backyard or local park (frontcountry) as much as it does in the wilderness (backcountry).

We should practice Leave No Trace in our attitude and actions wherever we go. Understanding nature strengthens our respect toward the environment.

When boys and leaders complete the requirements they may purchase a Cub Scout Leave No Trace temporary patch (No. 08797). Both the publication and patch are available through local councils. The patch should be displayed centered on the right pocket of the uniform.

Leave No Trace Frontcountry Guidelines
  1. Plan ahead
  2. Stick to trails
  3. Manage your pet
  4. Leave what you find
  5. Respect other visitors
  6. Trash your trash


Award Requirements:
  1. Discuss with your leader or parent/guardian the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  2. On three separate outings, practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
  3. Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, Let's Go Outdoors; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, Your Living World; boys in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, Family Outdoor Adventures; boys in a Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace - related service project.
  5. Promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
  6. Draw a poster to illustrate the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines and display it at a pack meeting.


Adult Award Requirements:
  1. Discuss with your den's Cub Scouts or your pack's leaders the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  2. On three separate outings demonstrate and practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
  3. Participate in presenting a den, pack, district, or council awareness session on Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project.
  5. Commit yourself to the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
  6. Assist at least three boys in earning Cub Scouting's Leave No Trace Awareness Award.


BSA Guidelines Page - for more details


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Medal of Merit

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The Merit Medal honors Scouts, Venturers and Scouters that have performed an act of meritorious service above and beyond what is normally expected of a youth or adult member of the Boy Scouts of America.

This act should demonstrate exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others.
The action does not necessarily need to involve rescue or saving life, but must demonstrate some aspect of Scouting ideals or skills.

You can read some stories of Real Scouts in Action for some examples.


Knot Description: Gold on Blue knot on tan background with tan border.

Award Requirements: Submit a recommendation with this Nomination Form.

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Messengers of Peace

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Messengers of Peace is a global initiative aimed at encouraging youth to work toward peace. Taking advantage of social media, scouts from around the world share their efforts in order to inspire other scouts to undertake similar projects.
The World Scout Committee is promoting this program and it is administered by the World Scout Bureau.

Any Scout or Scouter who participates in a qualifying project can wear the Messengers of Peace ring patch. It is displayed around the World Crest above the left pocket of the uniform. Patches can be purchased by a unit representative at a local Scout Shop or council service center.

A qualifying project has a significant impact on the community in one of these three dimensions of peace:
  1. Personal dimension: harmony, justice, and equality
  2. Community dimension: peace as opposed to hostility or violent conflict
  3. Relationship between humankin and environment: security, social and economic welfare, and environment


Getting the Patch
Units that want to purchase patches should submit their Messengers of Peace related projects through the Journey to Excellence website and check the 'Messengers of Peace' box. This adds the project to the map on the Messengers of Peace website and generates a unit certificate which should be taken to the Scout Shop to purchase patches.

Some Project Ideas
  • Personal Dimension:
    • Holiday party for children of prison inmates
    • Book drive for inner-city school
    • Visit nursing home residents
    • Participate in Feed the Children, Feed My Starving Children, Toys 4 Tots, or other organization charitable efforts
  • Community Dimension:
    • Build a community prayer or meditation garden
    • Paint over graffiti with peace-related murals
    • Participate as 'victims' for CERT or EMT training courses
    • Host a day of games, sports, and activities that brings together kids from different segments of your community
  • Environmental Dimension:
    • Conduct a park, schoolground, campground, or river clean-up day
    • Remove invasive species
    • Clear brush from fire buffer zone
    • Perform shoreline or natural area restoration

    More ideas at JTE Tips.

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National Den

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
The National Den Award recognizes dens that conduct a quality, year-round program. Service projects, Cub Scout Academics and Sports, field trips, character development, and Cub Scout camping are areas that are emphasized. Dens earn the award as a team, not as individual den members. The recognition is a ribbon for the den flag or den doodle.

national den award

To earn the National Den Award, a Cub Scout den must:
  • Have at least 50 percent of the den's Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, or Webelos Scouts attend two den meetings and one pack meeting or activity each month of the year.
  • Complete six of the following during the year:
    1. Use the denner system within the den.
    2. In a Tiger Cub den, use shared leadership and rotate the boy/adult host team.
    3. Have 50 percent of the den go on three field trips per year. A field trip may be used in place of a den meeting.
    4. As a den, attend a Cub Scout day camp, Cub Scout or Webelos Scout resident camp, or a council family camping event with at least 50 percent of the den membership.
    5. Conduct three den projects or activities leading to a Character Connections discussion.
    6. As a den, participate in at least one of the Cub Scout Sports programs.
    7. As a den, participate in at least one of the Cub Scout Academics programs.
    8. Have 50 percent of the den participate in a den conservation/resource project.
    9. Have 50 percent of the den participate in at least one den service project.

Once the requirements are completed as stated, the signed National Den Award application is sent to the local council service center where the ribbon can be obtained.

Download an application for the National Den Award.

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National Summertime Pack

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:summertime pack award pin A pack can qualify for the National Summertime Pack Award by planning and conducting three pack activities - one each in June, July, and August. This award can be an incentive for greater attendance at your summer pack activities.
Individual scouts that participate in all three pack events can receive the National Summertime Pack Award pin. Starting in 2008, there is a different color pin for each Cub Scout rank so earning the pin each year has more incentive.


national summertime pack award Qualifying packs receive a colorful streamer for their pack flag.

Dens with an average attendance of at least half their members at the three summer pack events will be eligible for a colorful den participation ribbon.

The purpose of the National Summertime Pack Award is to encourage packs to provide a year-round program by continuing to meet during the time periods when school is out of session for several weeks or months. If a pack is in a 'year-round school' (or is part of a home-school association), the pack could earn the Summertime Pack Award by having a special pack activity during those breaks.

A scout that earns the Summertime Pack Award pin should display it pinned on the right pocket flap. Multiple pins may be displayed from each year it is earned.
If the scout has also earned the Outdoor Activity Award, it should be sewn on the right pocket flap and then the Summertime pin pinned through the patch.

I've not been able to find 'official' info on the ranked Summertime Pack awards yet, but the local Scout Shop folks agreed with me on this interpretation...

Since the goal of the Summertime award is to have Packs continue the program through the summer, the summertime award scouts receive should match their current rank rather than the rank they are working on.
  • 1st grade - earn Tiger rank
  • summer - earn Tiger summertime pin
  • 2nd grade - earn Wolf rank
  • summer - earn Wolf summertime pin
  • 3rd grade - earn Bear rank
  • summer - earn Bear summertime pin
  • 4th grade - earn Webelos rank
  • summer - earn Webelos summertime pin
  • 5th grade - earn Arrow of Light, move on to Boy Scouts


Download the Application for the National Summertime Pack Award.


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Pack Competition

Intended for:Cub Scouts
Details:
There are three Pack competitions that are commonly held as annual events. Medals can be presented to all participants and blue, red, and white medals present to first, second, and third place. The competitions are:
  • Pinewood Derby - gravity powered wooden cars racing down a standard track.
  • Raingutter Regatta - scout breath-powered sailboats racing in a water-filled raingutter.
  • Space Derby - rubber-band propellor powered rockets racing on a stretched string.

These medals can be displayed pinned above the left pocket or on a red vest. Up to five medals can be displayed on the uniform shirt.

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Participation

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Packs and Troops will often have their own competitions between dens or patrols, or individual scouts. Districts may have competitions at camporees or other scouting events.
The BSA has official participation medals for use in any scouting activity. There are gold, silver, and bronze medals with a blue/gold ribbon for Cub Scouts or red/white ribbon for Boy Scouts.

These medals can be displayed pinned above the left pocket or on a red vest or scout blanket. Up to five medals can be displayed on the uniform shirt.

There are other styles of participation and placement ribbons available at your scout shop besides these medals.

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Physical Fitness

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
The award's objectives, developed by the Council Services Division of the National Council and the national BSA Health and Safety Committee, are as follows:
  • Encourage youth fitness in the BSA by providing positive role models and by enhancing youth awareness and understanding of fitness parameters, health risks, and personal circumstances.
  • Encourage physical fitness among Scouters by enhancing their awareness and understanding of fitness parameters, health risks, and personal circumstances.
  • Reduce the rate of stress- and fitness-related incidents throughout Scouting.


The award application form is no longer available at its old scouting.org location. The patch is still available on ScoutStuff.org as of 4/13/2014.

People who earn the recognition can receive a special certificate and can purchase and wear the unique BSA Physical Fitness Award patch. In addition, upon completion of the Fitness Award requirements, Scouts and Scouters may wear a special recognition pin and patch that can be purchased through their local council.

This award is a national program of emphasis designed to heighten fitness awareness and to help change the lifestyles of American youth and adults regarding exercise and a healthy diet to improve the quality of their lives.

This award has been developed to:
  • Encourage the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills that promote fitness and safe conduct.
  • Lay a skill, knowledge, and attitude foundation of the seven major components of fitness.
  • Improve health, fitness, and quality of life through daily physical activity.




The BSA Physical Fitness Award's core requirements are the following seven major components. They are used to measure an individual's improvement over time, not to establish an arbitrary minimum level of activity.

Posture: Posture is evaluated with a posture-rating chart. The Scout or Scouter is compared to a photo of his or her starting posture, noting 13 different body segments. Each body segment is scored as a five, three, or one, making a possible range of scores from 13 to 65. Higher scores over time reflect improving posture.
Accuracy: The target throw is used to measure accuracy. The Scout or Scouter makes 20 throws with a softball at a circular target and is scored on the number of times the target is hit.
Strength: The sit-up is used to measure strength. The Scout or Scouter lies on his or her back with knees bent and feet on the floor. The arms are crossed on the chest with the hands on the opposite shoulders. The feet are held by a partner to keep them on the floor. Curl to the sitting position until the elbows touch the thighs. Arms must remain on the chest and chin tucked on the chest. Return to the starting position, shoulder blades touching the floor. The score is the number of sit-ups made in a given time.
Agility: The side step is used to measure agility. Starting from a center line, the Scout or Scouter sidesteps alternately left and right between two lines 8 feet apart. He or she is scored on the number of lines crossed in 10 seconds.
Speed: The dash is used to measure speed. The score is the amount of time to the nearest half-second running a set distance that can be increased each year.
Balance: The squat stand is used to measure balance. The Scout or Scouter squats with hands on the floor and elbows against the inner knee. He or she leans forward until the feet are raised off the floor. The score is the number of seconds held in that position.
Endurance: The squat thrust is used to measure endurance. The Scout or Scouter starts from the standing position. He or she performs the usual four-position exercise. The score is the number of completed squat thrusts made in a given time.

Some of these tests measure more than the components they represent. For example, the sit-ups, a measure of strength, also reflect some endurance because of their repetition. The squat stand requires balance, its major component, but also requires strength and endurance to support the weight of the body on the arms.


Requirements:
  1. Complete a cardiovascular fitness evaluation/consultation with your personal health care provider. (This can be done as part of the examination required by any council-approved class 3 medical evaluation.)
  2. Using the BSA references listed after the seven major components, give a presentation to a BSA or other community youth group (at least eight youth participants) on cardiovascular fitness, diet, the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise, exercise recommendations for the Scout-age group, and healthy lifestyles.
  3. Review the BSA guidelines for the Athletics and other physical activity or personal fitness-oriented merit badge and explain steps you have taken to follow each of the guidelines for the fitness goals. Explain precautions to be taken for a physical fitness activity in each of the following: woods, fields, facilities, and waterfront.
  4. Explain to your mentor the symptoms of dehydration and hypothermia. Explain the special considerations for preventing dehydration and hypothermia.
  5. Properly outfit for physical activities with proper equipment, clothing, and footwear. Know your own capabilities and limitations. Illustrate how you would prepare for the physical fitness goals included in the award program.
  6. With supervision from your mentor or other qualified persons, set up a fitness goal-oriented plan using the seven major components of fitness.
  7. Demonstrate your ability to improve your strength, posture, endurance, agility, speed, accuracy, and balance with your own goal-oriented fitness plan.



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Recruiter Strip

Intended for:Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts
Details:

Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts may earn the Recruiter Strip by recruiting other boys to join scouts.

The strip is worn centered directly below the right pocket on the uniform.

There are no formal requirements for these strips. Each Council establishes the procedure for awarding the strip, so please check with your local council office or unit leader.

Usually, a Recruiter Strip is awarded to a Cub Scout or Boy Scout the first time he recruits a friend, relative, classmate, or other acquaintance to join his unit.

Normally, one strip can be awarded to a boy while a Cub Scout and another while he is a Boy Scout if he recruits at both levels.

boy scout recruiter patchThe national BSA and local Councils tend to have special recruiting drives for which collector recruiter patches are made available. For example, in 2007, the Centennial Recruiter program has been going on at the national level with this patch available to scouts that recruit another boy to join. This patch in addition to the recruiter strip is awarded since these kinds of patches are considered temporary patches.



Here are a couple more recruiter patches that have been available to scouts...


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Religious Emblem

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
To encourage members to grow stronger in their faith, religious groups have developed religious emblems programs. The Boy Scouts of America has approved of these programs and allows the emblems to be worn on the official uniform. The various religious groups administer the programs.
Once earned, the award is generally presented by the church or religious group but may also be recognized by the Scout unit at an event such as a Court of Honor or Troop meeting or Pack meeting. This award may be earned as a youth, or presented to an adult that is nominated.
For each faith, a specific set of requirements is published and is established by the religious faith and not by BSA. For a listing of resources for each of the religious faiths that participate in this program, see the P.R.A.Y. web site

Check with your local council service center or contact the religious organization directly to obtain the curriculum booklets.


See BSA Page for more info.

Knot Description: silver on silver knot on purple background with purple border.
Once earned as a youth, the knot may be displayed on the uniform from that time forward. If a Scout earns the youth award and as an adult later is presented the adult award as well, both knots may be worn.

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Spirit of the Eagle

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:The untimely death of a promising, exemplary young person represents a tragic, sorrowful occurrence for any family and community. For that reason the Boy Scouts of America created the Spirit of the Eagle Award. This award is an honorary, posthumous recognition for a registered BSA youth member who has lost his or her life in an accident or through illness. Bestowed by the National Court of Honor as part of the celebration of the young person's life, the award recognizes the joy, happiness, and life-fulfilling experience Scouting made in that life, while also helping to heal and comfort the youth member's family, loved ones, and friends with the loss.

Award guidelines:
  • recipient must be a registered youth member under 21 years of age at the time of his or her death
  • unit committee must submit an application for the award within six months of the youth member's death
  • unit committee must request the approval of the local council


Applications (BSA No. 92-108) are available through local council service centers or HERE.

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Tech Chip

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:

This is NOT an official BSA award. It was created by Troop 479 in Eden Prairie, MN. The troop has designed a training outline and has wallet cards for purchase - see Tech Chip Training Plan for details.

Some scout units ban electronic devices, such as cellphones, iPods, games, and radios, creating a situation in which adults become policemen, enforcing rules rather than training scouts. These same 'policemen' usually exempt themselves from the ban, causing an unfair environment. Some even confiscate devices, putting themselves at a financial risk for that device.

Scouting evolves as technology becomes available. Compasses, watches, GPS, LED lights, and other outdoor gear has improved over the years and scouts have taken advantage of those improvements. As technology continues to evolve and become more and more embedded in every part of our lives, scout leaders need to continue to make use of it. By teaching courteous use, scouts and adults can take advantage of technology to create a safer outdoors experience without reducing the value of the experience for others.


This training and certification grants a scout the privilege to carry and use electronic devices at scout activities. Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Venturers can use the same training and cards.

There is no patch available at this time.

To earn this certification, the scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following:
  1. Recite and agree to proper use of electronic devices:
    1. Use only earlier than defined "Lights Out" time.
    2. Use when it does not interfere with other activities.
    3. Use when it does not affect others experience, or my safety.
  2. Assume all liability for the devices I bring.
  3. Demonstrate placing my device in silent mode.



The Scout's "Tech Privileges" can be lost if he fails in his responsibility.

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Veteran Unit Bar

Intended for:All Scouts
Details:
Over the past 40 years, as scouting units have remained continuously chartered for longer and longer lengths of time, the Boy Scouts of America have introduced veteran unit bars. These cloth bars recognize units for their longevity.

There is a bar for every 5 years of charter, starting with 25 years. All bars are bronze with black numerals except for the 75 year bar introduced in 1985 and the 100 year bar introduced in 2010. The 75 year bar is red with silver numerals and the 100 year bar is red with gold numerals.

The bar is worn by all unit members, not just those that were members on the specific anniversay.

The bar is sewn on the uniform directly above the unit numerals. Units may choose to order custom one-piece unit numerals with the veteran bar included to reduce the number of patches to sew and ensure they are positioned correctly.

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William T. Hornaday

Intended for:All Scouts, Venturer Scouts
Details: The William T. Hornaday Award recognizes Scouts and Scouters for their service to conservation and ecology efforts in their communities. There are seven different Hornaday awards with varying requirements. The youth individual awards are based on earning certain merit badges and completing one or more significant conservation projects.
  • The Silver Medal award is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Boy Scout
  • The Gold Medal is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Scouter. The gold medal may be considered when a qualified Scouter is recommended by his or her council, by an established conservation organization, or by any recognized conservationist. The nominee must have demonstrated leadership and a commitment to the education of youth on a national or international level, reflecting the natural resource conservation/environmental awareness mission of the Boy Scouts of America. Nominations must be approved by the BSA's national conservation committee.
  • A Unit Certificate can be awarded to a pack, troop, or crew of five or more Scouts when at least 60% of then participate in completing a unique, substantial, conservational project, but the square knot is reserved for those earning one of the medals.


These are the merit badges used for the Hornaday awards:
EnergyFishingNature
Environmental ScienceFly-FishingNuclear Science
Fish and Wildlife ManagementGardeningOceanography
ForestryGeologyPlant Science
Public HealthInsect StudyPulp and Paper
Soil and Water ConservationLandscape ArchitectureReptile and Amphibian Study
Bird StudyMammal StudyWeather


The categories for conservation projects are:
  • Energy conservation
  • Soil and water conservation
  • Fish and wildlife management
  • Forestry and range management
  • Air and water pollution control
  • Resource recovery (recycling)
  • Hazardous material disposal and management
  • Invasive species control


Hornaday Awards:
  • Hornaday Badge - Scout earns three of the bold merit badges, plus two others. Complete a project in natural resource conservation, from one of the project categories listed.
  • Hornaday Bronze Medal - Scout earns the Environmental Science merit badge and at least three other bold merit badges, plus two others. Complete three projects from three separate categories listed.
  • Hornaday Silver Medal - Scout earns all bold merit badges, plus any three others. Completes four projects, one each from four of the eight project categories listed.


Knot Description: Green/blue/white on green/blue/white knot on tan background with tan border.

Award Requirements: Download application and nomination forms from BSA Hornaday page.

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