Emergency Preparedness Award for All scouts


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Emergency Preparedness   Emergency Preparedness Award   Scout Award

When a member has fulfilled the requirements, a completed application is submitted to the council. Upon approval, an Emergency Preparedness pin is awarded. The pin may be worn on civilian clothing or on the uniform, centered on the left pocket flap. The award may be earned more than once; for instance, as a young person advances through the ranks and is capable of more complex preparedness activities, but only one pin may be worn.




All emergency activities carried out by Scouting units must be appropriate for the ages and abilities of the young people involved. Units should participate only under the supervision of their own leaders, and plans for unit help must be coordinated with community agencies responsible for disaster preparedness.


Tiger Cub Requirements

  1. Cover a family fire plan and drill, and what to do if separated from the family.
  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  4. Take a nationally recognized first-aid course geared toward children such as American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT).
  5. Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
  6. Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.


Wolf Cub Scout Requirements

  1. Create a checklist to keep your home safe.
  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
  5. Join a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  6. Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.


Bear Cub Scout Requirements

  1. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  2. Learn how to shut off utilities to your home in an emergency.
  3. Learn simple rescue techniques.
  4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
  5. Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
  6. Organize a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  7. Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.


Webelos Scout Requirements

  1. Learn rescue techniques.
  2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project.
  3. Take a first-aid course.
  4. Learn to survive extreme weather situations.
  5. Learn about stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  6. Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.


Boy Scout and Varsity Scout Requirements

  1. Participate in creating an emergency plan for your home and for your troop or team's Scouting activities. Be sure you know the details of both emergency plans.
  2. Earn the First Aid or Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
  3. With your troop or team, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training conducted by community emergency preparedness agencies.
  4. Complete IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp ).


Venturer Requirements

  1. Complete a nationally recognized first-aid course or complete a nationally recognized Wilderness First Aid course.
  2. With your crew, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training coordinated by community emergency preparedness agencies.
  3. Complete IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp ).
  4. Plan and execute an emergency preparedness training event for a pack, troop or team.


Unit Volunteer Scouter Requirements


This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members.

Do any three of the following:

  1. Provide input to develop or improve an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  2. Participate actively in preparing an emergency action plan for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  3. Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  4. Take a basic first-aid/CPR/AED course.
  5. Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.
  6. Complete IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp ).


Council/District Volunteer Scouter Requirements


Do any three of the following:

  1. Provide input to develop or improve an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your council or district.
  2. Take a basic first-aid/CPR/AED course.
  3. Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for emergency disaster preparedness.
  4. Participate actively in developing an emergency preparedness program for a council or district activity such as a camporee or Scouting show.
  5. Complete IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp ).


Unit-Level Achievement


  1. Achieve all Mandatory Unit Requirements:
    • The unit members conduct a check or create a unit and personal first-aid kit.
    • The unit members conduct a safety check of their meeting place using the checklist in the Guide to Safe Scouting.
    • The Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, Coach, or Advisor and the assistant Cubmasters, Scoutmasters, Coaches, or Advisors, and the unit committee chair have in their possession and have read the most current Guide to Safe Scouting.
    • The unit members create an emergency action plan for unit use during regular meetings, tours, and activities. See http://scouting.org/filestore/doc/680-029.doc .
    • Greater than 40 percent of registered adults are trained in Safety Afloat and Safe Swim Defense.
    • Greater than 40 percent of registered members, including at least one adult, are trained in first aid and CPR/AED by a recognized agency such as the Emergency Care and Safety Institute, the American Red Cross, or the American Heart Association.
    • Greater than 40 percent of unit members completed the SCOUTStrong fitness program or earned the Quest Award.
    • Mandatory for troops and teams only: All youth members with a driving permit or driverís license have earned the Traffic Safety merit badge.
    • Mandatory for troops and teams only: Greater than 40 percent of registered Scouts have earned the First Aid merit badge and are certified in CPR/Wilderness First Aid.
    • Mandatory for Venturing crews only: All youth with a driving permit or driverís license have taken Venturing Out: Keys to Safe Driving online or attended a group presentation of the Risk Zone: Transporting Scouts Safely.
    • Mandatory for Venturing crews only: Greater than 40 percent of registered crew members are trained in CPR/AED by a nationally recognized agency such as the Emergency Care and Safety Institute, the American Red Cross, or the American Heart Association.
    • Mandatory for troops/teams/Venturing crews only: Greater than 40 percent of registered Scouts and adults have completed IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp
  2. Do one of the following:
    • The unit conducts a safety promotion with the community about emergency preparedness and/or readiness.
    • Identify a unitís risk management or health and safety officer. Attach a copy of the duties and responsibilities assigned to this position to the application.
  3. Achieve individual awards:
    • Bronze Level: If 30 percent of your youth and adult members have achieved the individual award.
    • Silver Level: If 40 percent of your youth and adult members have achieved the individual award.
    • Gold Level: If 50 percent of your youth and adult members have achieved the individual award.


Resources



Program Items


All Emergency Preparedness BSA items are available to local councils as Supply items, though the National Distribution Center.



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